Title

School Professionals’ Perceptions of Bullying and Mental Health of Adolescents

Location

2071

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

14-1-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

14-1-2017 11:50 AM

Abstract

This study was designed to explore school professionals’ perceptions of bullying and mental health in adolescents. Bullying is an ongoing problem in middle schools across the country. The participants’ perceptions were measured by observations during the interviews, transcribing the one-on-one interviews, and reviewing student documents such as bullying referrals and guidance counselor notes.

There were five research questions that were addressed in this study:

  1. What mental health factors do school professionals identify as a result of bullying in adolescents?

2. How do school professionals perceive the social influences between bullying and socioeconomic status as well as gender?

  1. Does physical appearance effect bullying in schools? If so, how?
  2. Do affluent students bully more? If so, why?
  3. Do students that come from single family households bully more?
  1. 3. What are school professionals’ perceptions of bullies; do they exhibit diminished mental health?
  1. Do you think cyberbullying causes more mental anguish then face-to-face bullying?
  1. Have you seen bullied students withdraw socially or have excessive absences in school?

The researcher chose the research questions based on problems that were perceived to be adding to bullying in middle school. The interviews took place over a month long period and were 45 minutes to one hour in length. The results yielded four themes that include: emotional stressors associated with bullying, females bully more than males, school districts need to provide more resources for students and school professionals to combat bullying, and students who self-identified as being Lesbian, Gay, Bi Sexual, Transgendered, and Questioning (LGBTQ) were the most targeted for face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying.

Recommendations to school administrators and district personnel include providing a comprehensive bullying program throughout the entire school district such as the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. Parents and community members need to be informed on how to identify bullying, especially with the onset of technology and social media.

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Jan 14th, 10:30 AM Jan 14th, 11:50 AM

School Professionals’ Perceptions of Bullying and Mental Health of Adolescents

2071

This study was designed to explore school professionals’ perceptions of bullying and mental health in adolescents. Bullying is an ongoing problem in middle schools across the country. The participants’ perceptions were measured by observations during the interviews, transcribing the one-on-one interviews, and reviewing student documents such as bullying referrals and guidance counselor notes.

There were five research questions that were addressed in this study:

  1. What mental health factors do school professionals identify as a result of bullying in adolescents?

2. How do school professionals perceive the social influences between bullying and socioeconomic status as well as gender?

  1. Does physical appearance effect bullying in schools? If so, how?
  2. Do affluent students bully more? If so, why?
  3. Do students that come from single family households bully more?
  1. 3. What are school professionals’ perceptions of bullies; do they exhibit diminished mental health?
  1. Do you think cyberbullying causes more mental anguish then face-to-face bullying?
  1. Have you seen bullied students withdraw socially or have excessive absences in school?

The researcher chose the research questions based on problems that were perceived to be adding to bullying in middle school. The interviews took place over a month long period and were 45 minutes to one hour in length. The results yielded four themes that include: emotional stressors associated with bullying, females bully more than males, school districts need to provide more resources for students and school professionals to combat bullying, and students who self-identified as being Lesbian, Gay, Bi Sexual, Transgendered, and Questioning (LGBTQ) were the most targeted for face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying.

Recommendations to school administrators and district personnel include providing a comprehensive bullying program throughout the entire school district such as the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. Parents and community members need to be informed on how to identify bullying, especially with the onset of technology and social media.