Title

“They Expect You to be Better”: Mentoring as a Tool of Resistance among Black Fraternity Men

Location

3031

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

13-1-2017 3:40 PM

End Date

13-1-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

This study examines the role of mentorship in Black Greek letter fraternities (BGLFs) in resisting cultural and institutional oppression. Based on twenty interviews with black male college students, we build upon the works of others that have sought to examine the functions BGLFs play among black men in college. Through a grounded analysis of interviews and participant observation, we find that peer mentorships produce positive academic and social outcomes for black men in BGLFs. We suggest that BGLF participation offers collegiate black men mentorships with older members who motivate them to succeed personally and academically, support in integrating them into the black student community, and helps develop their professionalism and leadership. This mentorship allows young black men to contest the negative controlling images of black men culturally, and the lack of institutional support at predominantly white colleges and universities.

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Jan 13th, 3:40 PM Jan 13th, 5:00 PM

“They Expect You to be Better”: Mentoring as a Tool of Resistance among Black Fraternity Men

3031

This study examines the role of mentorship in Black Greek letter fraternities (BGLFs) in resisting cultural and institutional oppression. Based on twenty interviews with black male college students, we build upon the works of others that have sought to examine the functions BGLFs play among black men in college. Through a grounded analysis of interviews and participant observation, we find that peer mentorships produce positive academic and social outcomes for black men in BGLFs. We suggest that BGLF participation offers collegiate black men mentorships with older members who motivate them to succeed personally and academically, support in integrating them into the black student community, and helps develop their professionalism and leadership. This mentorship allows young black men to contest the negative controlling images of black men culturally, and the lack of institutional support at predominantly white colleges and universities.