Title

Developing Qualitative Research Posters

Location

3030

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

13-1-2017 3:40 PM

End Date

13-1-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

One useful tool for sharing research is the poster session. Poster Sessions are typically designed for discussion about research projects that are in process or have been completed. Although it varies by field and conference, often poster sessions are done by graduate students and early career faculty. Yet many developing scholars receive little to no formal training in how to develop effective poster sessions. Finding published literature on the topic of developing can be challenging as much of the literature was published between 1990-2005 and often focuses on displaying quantitative data (e.g., Lawson, 2005; Miracle & King, 1994). Additionally, much of this literature appears in health fields (e.g. Butz, Kohr, & Jones, 2004; Halligan, 2008; Miracle & King, 1994). Very few published articles focus on displaying qualitative data (Russell, Gregory, & Gates, 1996; Wilson, & Hutchinson, 1997). Utilizing this research and personal experience, this session will present suggestions to help scholars develop a qualitative research poster that presents findings in a visually appealing method and effectively communicates the research so that it can reach a larger audience.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 13th, 3:40 PM Jan 13th, 5:00 PM

Developing Qualitative Research Posters

3030

One useful tool for sharing research is the poster session. Poster Sessions are typically designed for discussion about research projects that are in process or have been completed. Although it varies by field and conference, often poster sessions are done by graduate students and early career faculty. Yet many developing scholars receive little to no formal training in how to develop effective poster sessions. Finding published literature on the topic of developing can be challenging as much of the literature was published between 1990-2005 and often focuses on displaying quantitative data (e.g., Lawson, 2005; Miracle & King, 1994). Additionally, much of this literature appears in health fields (e.g. Butz, Kohr, & Jones, 2004; Halligan, 2008; Miracle & King, 1994). Very few published articles focus on displaying qualitative data (Russell, Gregory, & Gates, 1996; Wilson, & Hutchinson, 1997). Utilizing this research and personal experience, this session will present suggestions to help scholars develop a qualitative research poster that presents findings in a visually appealing method and effectively communicates the research so that it can reach a larger audience.