Title

Fickle Conversations in the Car: A Duoethnography Between A Married Couple In A Doctoral Program

Location

3033

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

13-1-2017 1:05 PM

End Date

13-1-2017 3:10 PM

Abstract

Guided by Pinar's concept of "curerre" as the process of reconstructing the past to influence our future understandings, we held conversations about our respective histories as married parents and full-time doctoral students during the summers of 2015 and 2016. We sought to critically interrogate and transform our personal understandings of knowledge regarding marriage and parenthood to gain greater consciousness of our present realities. Given our socialization in disparate contexts, how our respective knowledge of these matters came to be was a self-reflexive discovery and excavation of the educational curriculum which has guided our understandings. To answer questions like, "What do we know about marriage?" or "What do we know about parenthood?" we applied Foucault's discursive approach and Barad's posthumanist performativity to analyze how context and artifacts provided new understandings about each other. The methodology of duoethnography aligned with our goals to raise awareness of self through dialogic exchange and critical engagement. We discovered common themes in our fickle knowledge that quiver at the intersection of what marriage, parenting, and education mean to us at a given moment in time. This inquiry offers a critique of the duoethnographic process and implications for supporting married doctoral students.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 13th, 1:05 PM Jan 13th, 3:10 PM

Fickle Conversations in the Car: A Duoethnography Between A Married Couple In A Doctoral Program

3033

Guided by Pinar's concept of "curerre" as the process of reconstructing the past to influence our future understandings, we held conversations about our respective histories as married parents and full-time doctoral students during the summers of 2015 and 2016. We sought to critically interrogate and transform our personal understandings of knowledge regarding marriage and parenthood to gain greater consciousness of our present realities. Given our socialization in disparate contexts, how our respective knowledge of these matters came to be was a self-reflexive discovery and excavation of the educational curriculum which has guided our understandings. To answer questions like, "What do we know about marriage?" or "What do we know about parenthood?" we applied Foucault's discursive approach and Barad's posthumanist performativity to analyze how context and artifacts provided new understandings about each other. The methodology of duoethnography aligned with our goals to raise awareness of self through dialogic exchange and critical engagement. We discovered common themes in our fickle knowledge that quiver at the intersection of what marriage, parenting, and education mean to us at a given moment in time. This inquiry offers a critique of the duoethnographic process and implications for supporting married doctoral students.