Title

Exploring Connectedness: The Meaning of Transition Experiences for Patients Within a Forensic Psychiatric Service

Location

1049

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

12-1-2017 3:40 PM

End Date

12-1-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

We regard transition as the psychological adaptation process undergone in response to a significant event. The process of transition occurs throughout life for every human being. People transition from adolescence to adulthood, student to worker; they move geographical locations and adjust to a disease or accident. Patients within forensic psychiatric services, like the majority of the population, undergo a variety of transitions, such as moving wards. Moving to a less secure environment asks a lot of patients; they need to be able to place limitations on themselves, initiate self-involvement in certain activities, and make choices they have not had to make in a significant length of time. I conducted a phenomenological study to explore the experience of transitioning from a secure unit to the open rehabilitation ward within one regional forensic psychiatric service in New Zealand. I interviewed patients individually using a semi-structured format. Interviews occurred at three stages: prior to their transition commencing; during their transition program; and between two and four weeks after their program had completed. Four themes emerged from analysis: being-in-the-world of being free; stepping stones; doing what you have to, to prove oneself and assistance comes in many forms. Connectedness to people, the activities they do, and place were important in the success of the transition. The results of this study will assist health professionals to support patients through the transition process. Providing the right support will improve the experiences of those transitioning and increase the success of the transition.

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Jan 12th, 3:40 PM Jan 12th, 5:00 PM

Exploring Connectedness: The Meaning of Transition Experiences for Patients Within a Forensic Psychiatric Service

1049

We regard transition as the psychological adaptation process undergone in response to a significant event. The process of transition occurs throughout life for every human being. People transition from adolescence to adulthood, student to worker; they move geographical locations and adjust to a disease or accident. Patients within forensic psychiatric services, like the majority of the population, undergo a variety of transitions, such as moving wards. Moving to a less secure environment asks a lot of patients; they need to be able to place limitations on themselves, initiate self-involvement in certain activities, and make choices they have not had to make in a significant length of time. I conducted a phenomenological study to explore the experience of transitioning from a secure unit to the open rehabilitation ward within one regional forensic psychiatric service in New Zealand. I interviewed patients individually using a semi-structured format. Interviews occurred at three stages: prior to their transition commencing; during their transition program; and between two and four weeks after their program had completed. Four themes emerged from analysis: being-in-the-world of being free; stepping stones; doing what you have to, to prove oneself and assistance comes in many forms. Connectedness to people, the activities they do, and place were important in the success of the transition. The results of this study will assist health professionals to support patients through the transition process. Providing the right support will improve the experiences of those transitioning and increase the success of the transition.