Title

When Words Change Critical Care - A discursive analysis in Intensive Care Unit

Location

1053

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

12-1-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

12-1-2017 3:05 PM

Abstract

In critical care practice, one of the most stressful aspects is the necessity to decide in contexts characterized by high level of complexity: nevertheless, only a small number of scholars focused their attention on this issue and particularly from a qualitative point of view (Sinuff, Cook, Giacomini 2007; Giacomini, Cook, Deirdre 2009). A comparison with Intensive Care Units (ICUs) physicians reveals that they feel this lack: they need to see their Decision Making (DM) processes in a different way in order to understand them better. Their necessity generates a research with the aim to discover what discursive practices (DPs) distinguished an ICU team when it reaches a decision and how different DPs influence their DM processes. To reach this goal, the research design needs a methodological approach able to gather the essential meaning of the lived experiences and, in the meanwhile, grasp reality in as much detail as possible; for this reason, the research commits to a method that interweaves the Empirical Phenomenological Method with Grounded (Mortari 2002, 2007, 2009, 2010). This research produces a change in the awareness of the physicians involved in the research because they become conscious of the discursive profile of their own ICU and able to understand how the DPs that characterized their ICU influence their DM processes. From a methodological point of view, what makes different this research is the choice to create a qualitative analysis tool that reveals the DPs that characterized DM in ICU, holding together description and interpretation.

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Jan 12th, 1:15 PM Jan 12th, 3:05 PM

When Words Change Critical Care - A discursive analysis in Intensive Care Unit

1053

In critical care practice, one of the most stressful aspects is the necessity to decide in contexts characterized by high level of complexity: nevertheless, only a small number of scholars focused their attention on this issue and particularly from a qualitative point of view (Sinuff, Cook, Giacomini 2007; Giacomini, Cook, Deirdre 2009). A comparison with Intensive Care Units (ICUs) physicians reveals that they feel this lack: they need to see their Decision Making (DM) processes in a different way in order to understand them better. Their necessity generates a research with the aim to discover what discursive practices (DPs) distinguished an ICU team when it reaches a decision and how different DPs influence their DM processes. To reach this goal, the research design needs a methodological approach able to gather the essential meaning of the lived experiences and, in the meanwhile, grasp reality in as much detail as possible; for this reason, the research commits to a method that interweaves the Empirical Phenomenological Method with Grounded (Mortari 2002, 2007, 2009, 2010). This research produces a change in the awareness of the physicians involved in the research because they become conscious of the discursive profile of their own ICU and able to understand how the DPs that characterized their ICU influence their DM processes. From a methodological point of view, what makes different this research is the choice to create a qualitative analysis tool that reveals the DPs that characterized DM in ICU, holding together description and interpretation.