Title

Let’s Talk QUAL: Pedagogy for Embracing Qualitative Methodological Dialogue

Location

1052

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

12-1-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

12-1-2017 3:05 PM

Abstract

Let’s Talk QUAL is an opportunity outside of the academy for those interested in qualitative research to meet and talk about current methodological issues in the field, connect with scholars regarding research interests, and ask questions of other qualitative inquirers about methods, ethics, etc. Asking questions is difficult within the academic setting and can become overwhelming for students (Mendler, 2015) and challenging for faculty who may not situate themselves within the frameworks taught (Nordstrom & Happel-Parkins, 2016). Additionally, questions we ask in our research methods classroom can only be answered by those sitting in the classroom at that time (Horton & Moyers, 1983). The purpose of this presentation is to share a unique pedagogical process we created as a collaborative space for methodological, epistemological, and ontological dialogue as researchers (always in-training) to discover, describe, and interpret the messiness and robustness of the qualitative research process. We provide information about a dialogue-building strategy that includes gathering beginning researchers exploring what qualitative research is, to the more experienced members of the academic community who are well versed in the language, to anyone who happens to be present in the public space where we meet. Through Let’s Talk QUAL, students, staff, faculty, family members, and community members gather at a local business to question, interrogate, trouble, and wrestle with ideas, issues, and tensions in the field and engage in empowering and reflective talk. We aim to present our experiences, processes, and next steps as caring facilitators, organizers, coconspirators, rabble-rousers, volunteers, and group members.

Comments

We are interested in presenting as a paper, workshop, or panel!

Horton, M., & Moyers, B. (1983). The adventures of a radical hillbilly: An interview with Myles Horton. Appalachian Journal, 9(4), 248-285.

Mendler, A. (2009). Motivating students who don't care: Successful techniques for educators. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

Nordstrom, S. N., & Happel-Parkins, A. (2016). Methodological drag: Subversive performances of qualitative methodologist and pedagogical practices. Qualitative Inquiry, 22(2), 149-153.

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Jan 12th, 1:15 PM Jan 12th, 3:05 PM

Let’s Talk QUAL: Pedagogy for Embracing Qualitative Methodological Dialogue

1052

Let’s Talk QUAL is an opportunity outside of the academy for those interested in qualitative research to meet and talk about current methodological issues in the field, connect with scholars regarding research interests, and ask questions of other qualitative inquirers about methods, ethics, etc. Asking questions is difficult within the academic setting and can become overwhelming for students (Mendler, 2015) and challenging for faculty who may not situate themselves within the frameworks taught (Nordstrom & Happel-Parkins, 2016). Additionally, questions we ask in our research methods classroom can only be answered by those sitting in the classroom at that time (Horton & Moyers, 1983). The purpose of this presentation is to share a unique pedagogical process we created as a collaborative space for methodological, epistemological, and ontological dialogue as researchers (always in-training) to discover, describe, and interpret the messiness and robustness of the qualitative research process. We provide information about a dialogue-building strategy that includes gathering beginning researchers exploring what qualitative research is, to the more experienced members of the academic community who are well versed in the language, to anyone who happens to be present in the public space where we meet. Through Let’s Talk QUAL, students, staff, faculty, family members, and community members gather at a local business to question, interrogate, trouble, and wrestle with ideas, issues, and tensions in the field and engage in empowering and reflective talk. We aim to present our experiences, processes, and next steps as caring facilitators, organizers, coconspirators, rabble-rousers, volunteers, and group members.