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Abstract

In this collaborative auto-ethnographical inquiry, two developing scholar–practitioner educational leaders explore the notion of moral literacy through a lens of critical pedagogical bricolage. This study aims to reveal certain experiences of two doctoral candidates engaged in an educational doctorate, contemplating their identities as emergent leaders from diverse backgrounds. By approaching this inquiry from a qualitative and strictly post-positivist understanding of research, we aim to present critical components of our program and the literature presented in that program that led to our understanding of moral literacy’s role in theoretical and pragmatic provinces of educational leadership. Our analysis is presented in three themes: transformation of the candidate through the teaching of moral literacy, consideration of the interplay between local identity and moral literacy, and the potential of bricolage (or critical pedagogical bricolage) as a catalyst for teaching moral literacy.

Keywords

Auto-Ethnography, Bricolage, Critical Pedagogy, Educational Leadership, Moral Literacy, Scholar–Practitionership

Author Bio(s)

Chetanath Gautam is an assistant professor in Education Department and teaches in the Educational Leadership graduate program at Delaware State University. He received his doctorate in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. His research interests include educational leadership with special focus on educational research and curriculum studies. His research interests include global educational studies, educational leadership for social justice and democracy, and educational experiences of international students as well as diverse groups of learners. Correspondence regarding this article can be addressed directly to: cgautam@desu.edu.

Charles L. Lowery is an assistant professor in Educational Studies and teaches in the Educational Administration program at Ohio University. He earned his Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. Additionally, he has completed the Superintendent program at the University of Texas-Tyler. His research interests include educational leadership for social justice and democracy, perceptions and challenges of marginalized individuals in educational settings, and emerging metaphors of school leadership in the 21st century. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: loweryc@ohio.edu.

Publication Date

1-16-2017

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

 

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