Event Title

Simulation in a hybrid musculoskeletal physical therapy course: Development, adaptation, and outcomes

Speaker's Credentials

Melissa Lazinski, PT, DPT, OCS received her Doctor of Physical Therapy from Regis University and her Bachelors of Health Science in Physical Therapy from the University of Florida. She is Board Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy. She is an Associate Professor in the Hybrid Program of the School of Physical Therapy at Nova Southeastern University in Tampa, FL. Dr Lazinski is a charter member of the CHCS Teaching and Learning Academy and a past Chair of the Center for Academic and Professional Excellence.

Lance Cherry is an Associate Professor in the School of Physical Therapy at Nova Southeastern University. He holds an Ed.D. in Applied Physiology from Columbia University. He obtained his Master’s in physical therapy degree from Emory University. Dr. Cherry also earned his certification in Orthopedics from the American Physical Therapy Association. He is a reviewer for the Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice at Nova Southeastern University and a charter member of the Nova Southeastern University Teaching and Learning Academy. He maintains an active practice in an outpatient orthopedic clinic.

Location

Auditorium B

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

21-1-2017 10:35 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 11:05 AM

Abstract

Introduction: Simulation is an active learning strategy used in health care education to reinforce skill and behavior acquisition. To achieve the desired learning objectives, simulation experiences must have a purposeful design including sound pre-briefing and debriefing strategies. Purpose: This platform will present an example of a patient simulation performed in a hybrid musculoskeletal physical therapy course including the development and adaption to a hybrid course. Description of Innovation: Students engaged in a 3-part hybrid simulation experience consisting of online prebriefing, face-to-face simulation and debriefing, and online reflection with individual feedback. Prebriefing consisted of a posted patient case complete with pertinent medical history documents. The face-to-face patient interactions and debriefings were performed by course instructors who served as both standardized patient and debriefer. In the face-to-face portion, students received immediate feedback on performance. The final step included documentation and future planning for the patient with individual instructor feedback. The simulation experience was aligned with the demands of the course’s final assessment: a triple jump practical examination. Outcomes: Course outcomes, strengths and weakness of the experience, and student perceptions will be presented. Discussion: Simulation can enrich traditional classroom strategies by purposefully engaging students in scenarios that enhance psychomotor skills, affective behaviors, and clinical reasoning in a low risk environment. Student achievement on course assessments and realization of course objectives are potential benefits of including simulation in a musculoskeletal physical therapy course.

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Jan 21st, 10:35 AM Jan 21st, 11:05 AM

Simulation in a hybrid musculoskeletal physical therapy course: Development, adaptation, and outcomes

Auditorium B

Introduction: Simulation is an active learning strategy used in health care education to reinforce skill and behavior acquisition. To achieve the desired learning objectives, simulation experiences must have a purposeful design including sound pre-briefing and debriefing strategies. Purpose: This platform will present an example of a patient simulation performed in a hybrid musculoskeletal physical therapy course including the development and adaption to a hybrid course. Description of Innovation: Students engaged in a 3-part hybrid simulation experience consisting of online prebriefing, face-to-face simulation and debriefing, and online reflection with individual feedback. Prebriefing consisted of a posted patient case complete with pertinent medical history documents. The face-to-face patient interactions and debriefings were performed by course instructors who served as both standardized patient and debriefer. In the face-to-face portion, students received immediate feedback on performance. The final step included documentation and future planning for the patient with individual instructor feedback. The simulation experience was aligned with the demands of the course’s final assessment: a triple jump practical examination. Outcomes: Course outcomes, strengths and weakness of the experience, and student perceptions will be presented. Discussion: Simulation can enrich traditional classroom strategies by purposefully engaging students in scenarios that enhance psychomotor skills, affective behaviors, and clinical reasoning in a low risk environment. Student achievement on course assessments and realization of course objectives are potential benefits of including simulation in a musculoskeletal physical therapy course.