Event Title

Physical Therapy Student Experiences Regarding Problem-Based Learning and Development of Professional Core Values

Speaker's Credentials

Michelle E. Wormley, PT, PhD, CLT

Melissa M. Tovin, PT, MA, PhD, CEEAA, PCS

Stanley Wilson, PT, EdD, CEAS

Michelle Lusardi, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA

Location

Auditorium A

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

21-1-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 10:30 AM

Abstract

Introduction: Physical therapy programs are tasked to develop core values in their students as the foundation of professionalism. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an approach that intends to enrich exploration of issues in clinical decision making, understand how patient care is supported by other aspects of professional practice, and develop examination, intervention and communication skills. PBL also aims to provide a foundation for finding, evaluating, and implementing best available evidence to guide practice; and the students’ assumption of responsibility for self-directed, lifelong learning. Purpose: Currently there is little evidence about PBL graduates’ perceptions of their development of core values. This qualitative study explores new graduates’ understanding of their professional core value development during their education in a modified PBL curriculum. Methodology: Twenty seven of 49 students from one class of a modified PBL curriculum participated in this study at the time of graduation. Phenomenological qualitative methodology via semi-structured focus group interviews were used to foster an in-depth understanding of students’ experiences related to professional core value development. Interviews were thematically organized by the constant comparison method and several strategies were used to establish trustworthiness. A metaphor to elucidate the transition from student to professional is presented. Results: Ten themes representing core value development from the students’ perspective. An additional overaching theme “transformation” was also identified. Students described a process of “transformation” from student to professional, facilitated by the PBL curriculum design. Conclusion: The transformation from student to professional was supported by the curricular elements of the modified PBL process, according to study participants. These findings inform faculty on educational methods and curricular strategies which may enhance the development of professional core values in DPT students, regardless of curricular format.

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Jan 21st, 10:00 AM Jan 21st, 10:30 AM

Physical Therapy Student Experiences Regarding Problem-Based Learning and Development of Professional Core Values

Auditorium A

Introduction: Physical therapy programs are tasked to develop core values in their students as the foundation of professionalism. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an approach that intends to enrich exploration of issues in clinical decision making, understand how patient care is supported by other aspects of professional practice, and develop examination, intervention and communication skills. PBL also aims to provide a foundation for finding, evaluating, and implementing best available evidence to guide practice; and the students’ assumption of responsibility for self-directed, lifelong learning. Purpose: Currently there is little evidence about PBL graduates’ perceptions of their development of core values. This qualitative study explores new graduates’ understanding of their professional core value development during their education in a modified PBL curriculum. Methodology: Twenty seven of 49 students from one class of a modified PBL curriculum participated in this study at the time of graduation. Phenomenological qualitative methodology via semi-structured focus group interviews were used to foster an in-depth understanding of students’ experiences related to professional core value development. Interviews were thematically organized by the constant comparison method and several strategies were used to establish trustworthiness. A metaphor to elucidate the transition from student to professional is presented. Results: Ten themes representing core value development from the students’ perspective. An additional overaching theme “transformation” was also identified. Students described a process of “transformation” from student to professional, facilitated by the PBL curriculum design. Conclusion: The transformation from student to professional was supported by the curricular elements of the modified PBL process, according to study participants. These findings inform faculty on educational methods and curricular strategies which may enhance the development of professional core values in DPT students, regardless of curricular format.