Event Title

Use of Kingdomality Domains for Creating Student Teams

Speaker's Credentials

Robert McGory, M.S., Pharm.D. is Associate Professional Programs Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy

Graciela M. Armayor, Pharm.D., M.S., is Director of Curriculum Development and Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy

Barry Bleidt, PhD., Pharm.D. is Professor of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy

Location

Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-1-2017 11:45 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 12:15 PM

Abstract

Introduction: Accreditation standards for health care education emphasize team based interactions. Previously independent students struggled as team members. Purpose: Pharmacy students are assigned to teams to teach and support each other through active learning exercises. This project used Kingdomality, a popular team building tool that identifies 12 societal roles, to blend team members in a meaningful way. Methodology: Students answered 8 questions to determine their societal role. Teams were built with a blend of roles, matching polar opposites when possible. Students interacted in their team for an entire year within 3 courses. Teams were challenged with a variety of tasks, reflections, patient/provider interviews and solving clinical unknowns. Students evaluated their teammates at the end of the experience. Results: Distribution of Roles by Campus Role Davie (N=156) Palm Beach (N=48) San Juan (N=56) Prime Minister 8 0 0 Black Knight 24 1 3 Merchant 2 1 0 Shepherd 28 7 6 White Knight 53 20 32 Dreamer Minstrel 28 13 14 Engineer Builder 2 0 0 Scientist 0 0 0 Doctor 4 2 1 Benevolent Ruler 0 1 0 Bishop 0 0 0 Discoverer 7 3 0 The majority of students profiled as servants (shepherd, white knight, dreamer minstrel). There was minimal variation between campuses. Conclusion: Thirty-seven teams were created based on Kingdomality profiling. Variety of roles on a team was limited due to the majority of students profiling to servant based categories. Analysis of the outcome of team interactions is ongoing. Kingdomality will continue to be used for creating teams.

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Jan 21st, 11:45 AM Jan 21st, 12:15 PM

Use of Kingdomality Domains for Creating Student Teams

Atrium

Introduction: Accreditation standards for health care education emphasize team based interactions. Previously independent students struggled as team members. Purpose: Pharmacy students are assigned to teams to teach and support each other through active learning exercises. This project used Kingdomality, a popular team building tool that identifies 12 societal roles, to blend team members in a meaningful way. Methodology: Students answered 8 questions to determine their societal role. Teams were built with a blend of roles, matching polar opposites when possible. Students interacted in their team for an entire year within 3 courses. Teams were challenged with a variety of tasks, reflections, patient/provider interviews and solving clinical unknowns. Students evaluated their teammates at the end of the experience. Results: Distribution of Roles by Campus Role Davie (N=156) Palm Beach (N=48) San Juan (N=56) Prime Minister 8 0 0 Black Knight 24 1 3 Merchant 2 1 0 Shepherd 28 7 6 White Knight 53 20 32 Dreamer Minstrel 28 13 14 Engineer Builder 2 0 0 Scientist 0 0 0 Doctor 4 2 1 Benevolent Ruler 0 1 0 Bishop 0 0 0 Discoverer 7 3 0 The majority of students profiled as servants (shepherd, white knight, dreamer minstrel). There was minimal variation between campuses. Conclusion: Thirty-seven teams were created based on Kingdomality profiling. Variety of roles on a team was limited due to the majority of students profiling to servant based categories. Analysis of the outcome of team interactions is ongoing. Kingdomality will continue to be used for creating teams.