Event Title

Physician Assistant (PA) Students’ Perception of the Value of Medical Simulation in Physician Assistant Education

Speaker's Credentials

Lorilee H. Butler, DHSc, M.Ed., MPAS, PA-C, is the Program Director of the Physician Assistant Program at the Orlando Campus of Nova Southeastern University. She is also a licensed, certified physician assistant with 20 years of clinical family medicine experience.

Location

Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-1-2017 11:45 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 12:15 PM

Abstract

Objective: The use of high fidelity medical simulation has become commonplace in physician assistant education, however, there is limited research available about the value of this instructional modality. Considering the high cost of providing simulation equipment and faculty workload, more research is needed to ensure the value of simulation instruction. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study evaluates the level of satisfaction with a high fidelity medical simulation experience in a cohort of physician assistant students in their first year of didactic education. Fifty students completed a 13-item Likert scale survey that measured the effectiveness of medical simulation and student satisfaction with the learning experience. A Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to determine if satisfaction levels varied based on the self-identified learning style. Additionally, self-identified learning styles were cross-tabulated with satisfaction levels. Results: This study revealed a high level of student satisfaction with high fidelity medical simulation but showed no statistically significant difference (p=.805) between the self-identified learning styles and the level of satisfaction with the medical simulation experience.

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Jan 21st, 11:45 AM Jan 21st, 12:15 PM

Physician Assistant (PA) Students’ Perception of the Value of Medical Simulation in Physician Assistant Education

Atrium

Objective: The use of high fidelity medical simulation has become commonplace in physician assistant education, however, there is limited research available about the value of this instructional modality. Considering the high cost of providing simulation equipment and faculty workload, more research is needed to ensure the value of simulation instruction. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study evaluates the level of satisfaction with a high fidelity medical simulation experience in a cohort of physician assistant students in their first year of didactic education. Fifty students completed a 13-item Likert scale survey that measured the effectiveness of medical simulation and student satisfaction with the learning experience. A Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to determine if satisfaction levels varied based on the self-identified learning style. Additionally, self-identified learning styles were cross-tabulated with satisfaction levels. Results: This study revealed a high level of student satisfaction with high fidelity medical simulation but showed no statistically significant difference (p=.805) between the self-identified learning styles and the level of satisfaction with the medical simulation experience.