Event Title

First-Year Optometry Student Perspectives of Three Different Laboratory Teaching Strategies

Speaker's Credentials

Jamie Althoff, OD, received her Doctor of Optometry degree from Michigan College of Optometry in 2007. She completed her residency in Primary Care with emphasis in low vision and geriatrics. She has taught in the optics lecture and laboratory courses at NSU's College of Optometry since 2011.

Gregory Fecho, OD, received his Doctor of Optometry degree from NSU's College of Optometry in 2001. Following graduation, he completed a one-year residency program at Nova Southeastern University in Primary Care with emphasis in pediatrics and binocular vision. Dr. Fecho has since been a full-time faculty member at Nova Southeastern University and teaches lectures and laboratories in binocular vision and optometric theory and methods.

Location

Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-1-2017 11:45 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 12:15 PM

Abstract

Introduction: First-year optometry students at the NSU College of Optometry are required to complete a geometrical optics lecture course and accompanying laboratory. Laboratories are designed to emphasize concepts covered in the lectures with hands-on small group experiments. In 2012, the laboratory was conducted by instructing students to review lab materials before arriving, giving a pre-lab introduction of approximately thirty minutes, and assisting groups while they completed experiments. Research shows that it was highly unlikely that students were reviewing lab materials before arriving, and instructors frequently noted poor attention and comprehension during the pre-lab introductions and during the experiments. Purpose: New teaching strategies were implemented to foster an environment of independent, self-paced, active learning in the laboratory setting. Description of Innovation: Two new lab teaching strategies were implemented in 2013 and 2016, respectively. In 2013, lab materials were distributed via interactive iBooks, and students were required to complete a pre-lab quiz before arriving. In 2016, the pre-lab quizzes were replaced with post-lab quizzes to emphasize student comprehension during the labs. Outcomes: Surveys were conducted at the conclusion of the laboratory course for the 2012, 2013, and 2016 courses. Survey items were designed to assess students’ perceptions of preparedness and active, engaged learning before, during, and after labs. Responses showed student perceptions of their own engagement and learning improved with the introduction of iBooks in 2013. Certain quiz questions were repeated each year and suggested improved comprehension when post-lab quizzes were given in 2016. Discussion: Laboratory settings naturally promote more active learning than a traditional lecture setting. By expecting students to arrive to lab with thorough independent preparation and to understand the material before they leave through truly engaged participation, we have improved our utilization of this valuable instructional time.

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Jan 21st, 11:45 AM Jan 21st, 12:15 PM

First-Year Optometry Student Perspectives of Three Different Laboratory Teaching Strategies

Atrium

Introduction: First-year optometry students at the NSU College of Optometry are required to complete a geometrical optics lecture course and accompanying laboratory. Laboratories are designed to emphasize concepts covered in the lectures with hands-on small group experiments. In 2012, the laboratory was conducted by instructing students to review lab materials before arriving, giving a pre-lab introduction of approximately thirty minutes, and assisting groups while they completed experiments. Research shows that it was highly unlikely that students were reviewing lab materials before arriving, and instructors frequently noted poor attention and comprehension during the pre-lab introductions and during the experiments. Purpose: New teaching strategies were implemented to foster an environment of independent, self-paced, active learning in the laboratory setting. Description of Innovation: Two new lab teaching strategies were implemented in 2013 and 2016, respectively. In 2013, lab materials were distributed via interactive iBooks, and students were required to complete a pre-lab quiz before arriving. In 2016, the pre-lab quizzes were replaced with post-lab quizzes to emphasize student comprehension during the labs. Outcomes: Surveys were conducted at the conclusion of the laboratory course for the 2012, 2013, and 2016 courses. Survey items were designed to assess students’ perceptions of preparedness and active, engaged learning before, during, and after labs. Responses showed student perceptions of their own engagement and learning improved with the introduction of iBooks in 2013. Certain quiz questions were repeated each year and suggested improved comprehension when post-lab quizzes were given in 2016. Discussion: Laboratory settings naturally promote more active learning than a traditional lecture setting. By expecting students to arrive to lab with thorough independent preparation and to understand the material before they leave through truly engaged participation, we have improved our utilization of this valuable instructional time.