Event Title

How to use text messaging as a supplemental teaching tool in distance education

Speaker's Credentials

Jared Bucker is an associate professor in the Instructional Design and Technology department at the Fischler College of Education at Nova Southeastern University where he teaches courses in instructional technology, instructional media, learning theories and curriculum development. He received his Ph.D. in Educational Research in 2001 from the University of Miami (Florida), where he also obtained his Microsoft Systems Engineering Certification. His research interests primarily involve the use of technology in teaching and learning, particularly related to educational assessment.

Location

Auditorium A

Format

Workshop

Start Date

21-1-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

21-1-2017 2:00 PM

Abstract

Today’s students are far more technologically advanced than ever before. Much more efforts must be made by faculty to “catch up” with millennial's preferred method of communication. A recent study by the Pew Research Center (http://www.pewinternet.org/topics/texting/) found that young adults prefer texting to voice calls/email. Smartphone owners between the ages of 18 and 24 exchange an average of 109.5 messages on a normal day—that works out to more than 3,200 texts per month—and the typical or median smartphone owner in this age group sends or receives 50 messages per day (or 1500 messages per month). There is no denying that texting has become the new medium for communicating among this age group. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide educators with suggestions on how to effectively incorporate texting in classes as a supplemental method of instruction. Personal experiences by an online educator will be provided, including how to use the latest technology tools to enhance instruction via text based correspondence.

Topic Area

Scholarship

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Jan 21st, 1:00 PM Jan 21st, 2:00 PM

How to use text messaging as a supplemental teaching tool in distance education

Auditorium A

Today’s students are far more technologically advanced than ever before. Much more efforts must be made by faculty to “catch up” with millennial's preferred method of communication. A recent study by the Pew Research Center (http://www.pewinternet.org/topics/texting/) found that young adults prefer texting to voice calls/email. Smartphone owners between the ages of 18 and 24 exchange an average of 109.5 messages on a normal day—that works out to more than 3,200 texts per month—and the typical or median smartphone owner in this age group sends or receives 50 messages per day (or 1500 messages per month). There is no denying that texting has become the new medium for communicating among this age group. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide educators with suggestions on how to effectively incorporate texting in classes as a supplemental method of instruction. Personal experiences by an online educator will be provided, including how to use the latest technology tools to enhance instruction via text based correspondence.