Event Title

Identifying opinion leaders for diffusion of innovations

Location

Terry

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

24-1-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

24-1-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Choosing whether or not to adopt an innovation can be scary. Knowing someone who has already successfully adopted it can make the decision easier.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate a new tool for identifying opinion leaders. Such a tool will be useful for change agents who seek to spread an innovation more rapidly through a community.

METHODOLOGY: Current instruments for identifying opinion leaders do so by assessing past instances of opinion leadership: "How often have members of your community asked you to recommend innovations?" or "Do you advise members of your community on innovations they should adopt?". This new instrument is able to identify potential opinion leaders by assessing a cluster of attitudes toward behaviors associated with opinion leadership.

RESULTS: Use of this instrument to identify potential opinion leaders will enable change agents to structure tasks to allow the potential opinion leader to grow into the role of opinion leader for his or her community.

CONCLUSIONS: Discussion will center on (a) what kinds of tasks would best allow the potential opinion leader to grow into the role of opinion leader, (b) the necessity of growing new opinion leaders to advance different innovations, and (c) the necessity of monitoring the effectiveness of opinion leaders—one size doesn't fit all and the well has run dry.

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Jan 24th, 10:00 AM Jan 24th, 10:30 AM

Identifying opinion leaders for diffusion of innovations

Terry

INTRODUCTION: Choosing whether or not to adopt an innovation can be scary. Knowing someone who has already successfully adopted it can make the decision easier.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate a new tool for identifying opinion leaders. Such a tool will be useful for change agents who seek to spread an innovation more rapidly through a community.

METHODOLOGY: Current instruments for identifying opinion leaders do so by assessing past instances of opinion leadership: "How often have members of your community asked you to recommend innovations?" or "Do you advise members of your community on innovations they should adopt?". This new instrument is able to identify potential opinion leaders by assessing a cluster of attitudes toward behaviors associated with opinion leadership.

RESULTS: Use of this instrument to identify potential opinion leaders will enable change agents to structure tasks to allow the potential opinion leader to grow into the role of opinion leader for his or her community.

CONCLUSIONS: Discussion will center on (a) what kinds of tasks would best allow the potential opinion leader to grow into the role of opinion leader, (b) the necessity of growing new opinion leaders to advance different innovations, and (c) the necessity of monitoring the effectiveness of opinion leaders—one size doesn't fit all and the well has run dry.