Event Title

CPR retention for 2011 AHA criteria: Will they remember it when needed?

Location

Marder

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

26-1-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

26-1-2013 10:30 AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification is required for health professions students and public safety personnel at most universities. In 2011, the American Heart Association (AHA) revised the CPR guidelines. Changes included modifications in instruction and content; live instruction with video clips, psychomotor demonstration and hands on practice with mannequins and AEDs; testing with immediate feedback on redo of cases until success; and a multiple choice exam with passing of -3 or better. Based on the literature, knowledge retention has been shown to deteriorate over time amongst all populations. No retention data currently exists on the 2011 version.

PURPOSE: To determine CPR retention of revised 2011 AHA guidelines at prescribed intervals in a representative CPR certified student and lay sample: PT, OD, and public safety.

METHODOLOGY: This study is examining cognitive retention with AHA written examination (with permission) repeat and cognitive/psychomotor retention by replication of case based CPR performance using resuscitation mannequins, portable defibrillators, face masks, and digital recording. Retesting is between 6 and 12 months. All subjects are taking the written exam and 1 in 4 is taking the psychomotor component. The trainer who coordinates university CPR certification administers the case component and assesses the digital recordings.

RESULTS: In the initial group, 33/33 students failed the AHA written exam at ~ 6 months post. Results of the case-based psychomotor component were similar.

CONCLUSIONS: Although guidelines and instruction have been modified, preliminary results indicate that changes failed to improve retention. This may indicate the need for more frequent certifications than every 2 years, or other interim refresher training.

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Jan 26th, 10:00 AM Jan 26th, 10:30 AM

CPR retention for 2011 AHA criteria: Will they remember it when needed?

Marder

INTRODUCTION: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification is required for health professions students and public safety personnel at most universities. In 2011, the American Heart Association (AHA) revised the CPR guidelines. Changes included modifications in instruction and content; live instruction with video clips, psychomotor demonstration and hands on practice with mannequins and AEDs; testing with immediate feedback on redo of cases until success; and a multiple choice exam with passing of -3 or better. Based on the literature, knowledge retention has been shown to deteriorate over time amongst all populations. No retention data currently exists on the 2011 version.

PURPOSE: To determine CPR retention of revised 2011 AHA guidelines at prescribed intervals in a representative CPR certified student and lay sample: PT, OD, and public safety.

METHODOLOGY: This study is examining cognitive retention with AHA written examination (with permission) repeat and cognitive/psychomotor retention by replication of case based CPR performance using resuscitation mannequins, portable defibrillators, face masks, and digital recording. Retesting is between 6 and 12 months. All subjects are taking the written exam and 1 in 4 is taking the psychomotor component. The trainer who coordinates university CPR certification administers the case component and assesses the digital recordings.

RESULTS: In the initial group, 33/33 students failed the AHA written exam at ~ 6 months post. Results of the case-based psychomotor component were similar.

CONCLUSIONS: Although guidelines and instruction have been modified, preliminary results indicate that changes failed to improve retention. This may indicate the need for more frequent certifications than every 2 years, or other interim refresher training.