Event Title

Facilitating professional behaviors among PT students during clinical learning

Location

Terry

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

26-1-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

26-1-2013 10:30 AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Now more than ever, physical therapy graduates must demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors such as, effective use of feedback, communication skills and stress management abilities that ensure a fluid transition from novice to a reflective practitioner. For this reason accrediting bodies, academic and clinical faculties are interested in clinical instructors that expedite desirable learning outcomes in students and future professionals.

PURPOSE: Problematic however, is professional behaviors are often intangible, difficult to recognize and evaluate by clinical instructors due to their affective nature. Using the Facilitation Process Model proposed by Warren May (2007), this presentation will seek to inform all stakeholders in health education about teaching approaches and strategies used to identify, apply, evaluate and consult with students on professional behaviors both in the course room and during clinical learning experiences.

METHODOLOGY: Via presentation of new information participants will first begin to form knowledge about professional behaviors and understand that affective behaviors in fact can be developed during professional programs. Second, via group discussion and self reflection the participants should begin to form an attitude of empowerment and make a decision to adopt these new practices proposed by May (2007). Third, video analysis will help the participants to recognition and implement appropriate teaching approaches to professional behaviors.

RESULTS: At the conclusion of this presentation stakeholders in all health professions will be able to (a)recognize both social and cognitive tenets prescribed to theoretical models of teaching and learning professional behaviors (b) identify novice, emerging and entry level professional behaviors (c)apply effective approaches to facilitate professional behaviors(d)evaluate outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Inappropriate professional behaviors can potentially affect patient care and outcomes. This has far-reaching implications for all the stakeholders in health care. Students who are interested in developing a professional identity during their clinical education experiences may appreciate the suggested learning approaches Students can deepen their learning of professional competence. Likewise, clinical instructors may glean ideas as to how to identify, plan, structure and progress teaching activities that facilitate professional behaviors among their students. Academic instructors can design instructional activities that prepare students for their clinical internship.

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Jan 26th, 10:00 AM Jan 26th, 10:30 AM

Facilitating professional behaviors among PT students during clinical learning

Terry

INTRODUCTION: Now more than ever, physical therapy graduates must demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors such as, effective use of feedback, communication skills and stress management abilities that ensure a fluid transition from novice to a reflective practitioner. For this reason accrediting bodies, academic and clinical faculties are interested in clinical instructors that expedite desirable learning outcomes in students and future professionals.

PURPOSE: Problematic however, is professional behaviors are often intangible, difficult to recognize and evaluate by clinical instructors due to their affective nature. Using the Facilitation Process Model proposed by Warren May (2007), this presentation will seek to inform all stakeholders in health education about teaching approaches and strategies used to identify, apply, evaluate and consult with students on professional behaviors both in the course room and during clinical learning experiences.

METHODOLOGY: Via presentation of new information participants will first begin to form knowledge about professional behaviors and understand that affective behaviors in fact can be developed during professional programs. Second, via group discussion and self reflection the participants should begin to form an attitude of empowerment and make a decision to adopt these new practices proposed by May (2007). Third, video analysis will help the participants to recognition and implement appropriate teaching approaches to professional behaviors.

RESULTS: At the conclusion of this presentation stakeholders in all health professions will be able to (a)recognize both social and cognitive tenets prescribed to theoretical models of teaching and learning professional behaviors (b) identify novice, emerging and entry level professional behaviors (c)apply effective approaches to facilitate professional behaviors(d)evaluate outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Inappropriate professional behaviors can potentially affect patient care and outcomes. This has far-reaching implications for all the stakeholders in health care. Students who are interested in developing a professional identity during their clinical education experiences may appreciate the suggested learning approaches Students can deepen their learning of professional competence. Likewise, clinical instructors may glean ideas as to how to identify, plan, structure and progress teaching activities that facilitate professional behaviors among their students. Academic instructors can design instructional activities that prepare students for their clinical internship.