Event Title

The role of simulations in assessing learning: Re-thinking the capstone project

Location

Auditorium A

Format

Workshop

Start Date

26-1-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

26-1-2013 2:00 PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Dr. Bucker is an accomplished author in the field of instructional technology and distance education. With over 40 publications, he has a clearly defined research agenda and leadership role within the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education at Nova Southeastern University.

PURPOSE: The session will summarize the findings of an exhaustive analysis and review of the use of simulations in assessing student learning at the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education.

METHODOLOGY: The session will be conducted as an overview of a simulation course required of all NSU students in graduate programs in Education. Data were collected over four years which represent the impact of the simulation on student learning.

RESULTS: Simulations have been used university-wide in an attempt to provide cuttingedge, real-world scenarios used to supplement instruction. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive and students have asked for additional simulation experiences, which are forthcoming.

CONCLUSIONS: While capstones have been traditionally used as a primary method of summative assessment, effective, additional opportunities to measure course learning outcomes through alternative assessment is both warranted and welcomed.

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Jan 26th, 1:00 PM Jan 26th, 2:00 PM

The role of simulations in assessing learning: Re-thinking the capstone project

Auditorium A

INTRODUCTION: Dr. Bucker is an accomplished author in the field of instructional technology and distance education. With over 40 publications, he has a clearly defined research agenda and leadership role within the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education at Nova Southeastern University.

PURPOSE: The session will summarize the findings of an exhaustive analysis and review of the use of simulations in assessing student learning at the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education.

METHODOLOGY: The session will be conducted as an overview of a simulation course required of all NSU students in graduate programs in Education. Data were collected over four years which represent the impact of the simulation on student learning.

RESULTS: Simulations have been used university-wide in an attempt to provide cuttingedge, real-world scenarios used to supplement instruction. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive and students have asked for additional simulation experiences, which are forthcoming.

CONCLUSIONS: While capstones have been traditionally used as a primary method of summative assessment, effective, additional opportunities to measure course learning outcomes through alternative assessment is both warranted and welcomed.