Event Title

Can we Move Beyond Terminology? Professionalism from Occupation to Profession: A Case Study

Location

Auditorium B

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

15-1-2011 9:45 AM

End Date

15-1-2011 10:15 AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Words evolve and their meanings or usage change. In addition, roles and positions of employees in the health care system hierarchy also evolve. These practical changes may not always be reflected in perception or attitude within and/or between hierarchical strata. A dissertation research, exploring the needs of role change in the field of diagnostic vascular sonography, yielded results worthy of exploration.

PURPOSE: The goal of this presentation was to present how occupational or professional roles can unconsciously or unintentionally influence perception or attitude toward professionalism or professionalization.

METHODOLOGY: Literature search on the etymology and usage of the words profession, professionalism, and professionalization was performed to gain understanding of perception of their meanings in regard to the people working within the health care system. The publications retrieved then served as a base of reflection against the results of a needs assessment study done to explore the feasibility of a role change in one of the fields of diagnostic imaging, known as vascular sonography.

RESULTS: Ascension of some technologists in diagnostic medical sonography to a more independent role has been a successful model in the United Kingdom and Australia. The application of this model in the United States is facing reticence and concerns. Among probably many other roadblocks, attitude and perception of the role as an occupation or a profession seem to be an impediment to the process.

CONCLUSIONS: Is professionalism a matter of perception and attitude of role in the workforce? Can we model or teach professionalism in that context?

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Jan 15th, 9:45 AM Jan 15th, 10:15 AM

Can we Move Beyond Terminology? Professionalism from Occupation to Profession: A Case Study

Auditorium B

INTRODUCTION: Words evolve and their meanings or usage change. In addition, roles and positions of employees in the health care system hierarchy also evolve. These practical changes may not always be reflected in perception or attitude within and/or between hierarchical strata. A dissertation research, exploring the needs of role change in the field of diagnostic vascular sonography, yielded results worthy of exploration.

PURPOSE: The goal of this presentation was to present how occupational or professional roles can unconsciously or unintentionally influence perception or attitude toward professionalism or professionalization.

METHODOLOGY: Literature search on the etymology and usage of the words profession, professionalism, and professionalization was performed to gain understanding of perception of their meanings in regard to the people working within the health care system. The publications retrieved then served as a base of reflection against the results of a needs assessment study done to explore the feasibility of a role change in one of the fields of diagnostic imaging, known as vascular sonography.

RESULTS: Ascension of some technologists in diagnostic medical sonography to a more independent role has been a successful model in the United Kingdom and Australia. The application of this model in the United States is facing reticence and concerns. Among probably many other roadblocks, attitude and perception of the role as an occupation or a profession seem to be an impediment to the process.

CONCLUSIONS: Is professionalism a matter of perception and attitude of role in the workforce? Can we model or teach professionalism in that context?