Event Title

Effects of multitasking on the academic performance of the millennial generation

Location

HPD South Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-1-2010 11:30 AM

End Date

16-1-2010 12:30 PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: This applied dissertation was designed to analyze media multitasking and its possible effects on the academic performance of the millennial generation.

PURPOSE: In this analysis, the researcher analyzed the implications of dividing one’s attention into many small slices while attending to academic tasks. Schools across the country are experiencing an influx of students who multitask using assorted media while performing academic tasks in their home environment. As a result, parents, teachers, and administrators are concerned about the media’s effect on academic performance in the home and how that translates to the classroom environment.

METHODOLOGY: This research attempted to ascertain the types of media being used by middle school-age students by the use of the survey. This information was used to replicate their use while performing academic tasks in a classroom environment. The collected data were analyzed to show the effects, if any, on academic performance.

RESULTS: When completing the first assessment, students had no extraordinary distractions. When completing the second assessment, the students had the one distraction of watching television. When completing the third assessment, the students had an additional distraction of listening to MP3 players or iPods added to the first distraction or media task. The fourth and final assessment included the aforementioned two distractions, or media tasks, plus an additional distraction, or media task, of talking or texting on the phone.

CONCLUSIONS: An analysis of the data revealed that students’ academic performance was negatively affected in the number of problems completed and the percentage of accuracy with each addition of media.

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Jan 16th, 11:30 AM Jan 16th, 12:30 PM

Effects of multitasking on the academic performance of the millennial generation

HPD South Atrium

INTRODUCTION: This applied dissertation was designed to analyze media multitasking and its possible effects on the academic performance of the millennial generation.

PURPOSE: In this analysis, the researcher analyzed the implications of dividing one’s attention into many small slices while attending to academic tasks. Schools across the country are experiencing an influx of students who multitask using assorted media while performing academic tasks in their home environment. As a result, parents, teachers, and administrators are concerned about the media’s effect on academic performance in the home and how that translates to the classroom environment.

METHODOLOGY: This research attempted to ascertain the types of media being used by middle school-age students by the use of the survey. This information was used to replicate their use while performing academic tasks in a classroom environment. The collected data were analyzed to show the effects, if any, on academic performance.

RESULTS: When completing the first assessment, students had no extraordinary distractions. When completing the second assessment, the students had the one distraction of watching television. When completing the third assessment, the students had an additional distraction of listening to MP3 players or iPods added to the first distraction or media task. The fourth and final assessment included the aforementioned two distractions, or media tasks, plus an additional distraction, or media task, of talking or texting on the phone.

CONCLUSIONS: An analysis of the data revealed that students’ academic performance was negatively affected in the number of problems completed and the percentage of accuracy with each addition of media.