Event Title

The externalization of adult learning in online environments

Location

Terry

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

16-1-2010 11:00 AM

End Date

16-1-2010 11:30 AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There is increasing evidence that older and more successful learners may self-report relatively external locus of control compared to younger learners. All students were equated for rote memory performance, pretest knowledge about multimedia pedagogy, and content knowledge in statistics and conflict resolution. PURPOSE: The purpose of this research is to develop a structural model of the strongest possible online learning among health science college students across the 20 to 60 year old range.

METHODOLOGY: Participants: The 109 participants were graduate students in Health Science who are training for a doctorate and plan to teach and serve as professional leaders in a wide range of health care settings. Materials: During the first and only physical meeting of the class, at the beginning of the term, consenting participants were asked to complete a pretest knowledge test, and an Internal Control Index (Duttweiler, 1984; Rotter, 1969) evaluation. The Internal Control Index (Duttweiler, 1984) was administered in an attempt to determine self-reliance, motivation, and disposition toward challenges and/or adversity. To assess these qualities the participants were presented with 28 statements such as: “When part of a group, I prefer to let other people make all the decisions” or “I prefer to learn the facts about something from someone else rather than having to dig them out for myself”. Participants were then asked to decide, on a scale of A-E (A being rarely, E representing usually). Procedure: Participants were given one (1) full week to complete the task of viewing a presentation and then taking the corresponding quiz. A 10-minute time limit was imposed upon the quiz and the questions consisted of a combination of rote memorization and learning transfer items. Online activity was measured by total hits to the website, total passive hits to the discussion posting or slides, and total active hits in the form of contributions to the discussion posting.

RESULTS: Millennial students showed poorer transfer memory and more internal locus of control (LOC) than older students. Late boomers represented the most external LOC and were better at transfer memory tasks. Late boomers were also more active in the websites associated with the online courses.

CONCLUSIONS: The results support a socio-cultural interpretation of the externalization of adult online learners.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 16th, 11:00 AM Jan 16th, 11:30 AM

The externalization of adult learning in online environments

Terry

INTRODUCTION: There is increasing evidence that older and more successful learners may self-report relatively external locus of control compared to younger learners. All students were equated for rote memory performance, pretest knowledge about multimedia pedagogy, and content knowledge in statistics and conflict resolution. PURPOSE: The purpose of this research is to develop a structural model of the strongest possible online learning among health science college students across the 20 to 60 year old range.

METHODOLOGY: Participants: The 109 participants were graduate students in Health Science who are training for a doctorate and plan to teach and serve as professional leaders in a wide range of health care settings. Materials: During the first and only physical meeting of the class, at the beginning of the term, consenting participants were asked to complete a pretest knowledge test, and an Internal Control Index (Duttweiler, 1984; Rotter, 1969) evaluation. The Internal Control Index (Duttweiler, 1984) was administered in an attempt to determine self-reliance, motivation, and disposition toward challenges and/or adversity. To assess these qualities the participants were presented with 28 statements such as: “When part of a group, I prefer to let other people make all the decisions” or “I prefer to learn the facts about something from someone else rather than having to dig them out for myself”. Participants were then asked to decide, on a scale of A-E (A being rarely, E representing usually). Procedure: Participants were given one (1) full week to complete the task of viewing a presentation and then taking the corresponding quiz. A 10-minute time limit was imposed upon the quiz and the questions consisted of a combination of rote memorization and learning transfer items. Online activity was measured by total hits to the website, total passive hits to the discussion posting or slides, and total active hits in the form of contributions to the discussion posting.

RESULTS: Millennial students showed poorer transfer memory and more internal locus of control (LOC) than older students. Late boomers represented the most external LOC and were better at transfer memory tasks. Late boomers were also more active in the websites associated with the online courses.

CONCLUSIONS: The results support a socio-cultural interpretation of the externalization of adult online learners.