Event Title

THE EFFICACY OF PLATELET RICH PLASMA AS AN INTERVENTION FOR PATELLAR TENDINOPATHY: A CASE SERIES

Location

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. Determine the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections on pain, function, and tendon morphology among subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Background. Patellar tendinopathy is common among athletic individuals with a point prevalence ranging from 3 to 45%. The condition has a predilection for chronicity, with persistent symptoms reported up to 15- years following diagnosis. Interventions range from conservative to surgical with evidence suggesting more than 50% have recalcitrant symptoms despite care. PRP is a viable surgical alternative that may reverse the pathological cascade without the cost, risks, and down-time of surgery. Methods. A one-group pretest to posttest design using 5 athletic individuals (age 20-26) diagnosed with chronic patellar tendinopathy (symptom range 3-months to 4 years) based on musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK/US) and clinical diagnosis. Subjects received 3 PRP injections over of 6-weeks. Pain, tenderness, and the patient specific functional scale (PSFS)) were assessed at baseline, 2-weeks, 1- and 3-months. Global rating of change (GROC) and tendon morphology using MSK/US was assessed at 2 weeks, 1- and 3 months following initial intervention. Results. At the 3- month follow-up all subjects demonstrated improvement on MSK/US with decreased thickening hypoechogenicity of tendon fibers. Average pain changed from a mean 4/10 to 1/10 with 4 subjects having complete resolution of tenderness. Functionalsport impairments improved from a mean 60% perceived limitation to 10% on the PSFS. The GROC identified self-perceived improvement among all participants. Conclusion. A 3-injection PRP intervention improved pain, tenderness, and function to a level that satisfied minimum clinically important differences with MSK/US images supporting overall healing. Grants. The authors would like to acknowledge the Nova Southeastern University President’s Faculty Research and Development Grant as well as the Health Professions Division, Faculty Research Grant for providing funding.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

THE EFFICACY OF PLATELET RICH PLASMA AS AN INTERVENTION FOR PATELLAR TENDINOPATHY: A CASE SERIES

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Objective. Determine the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections on pain, function, and tendon morphology among subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Background. Patellar tendinopathy is common among athletic individuals with a point prevalence ranging from 3 to 45%. The condition has a predilection for chronicity, with persistent symptoms reported up to 15- years following diagnosis. Interventions range from conservative to surgical with evidence suggesting more than 50% have recalcitrant symptoms despite care. PRP is a viable surgical alternative that may reverse the pathological cascade without the cost, risks, and down-time of surgery. Methods. A one-group pretest to posttest design using 5 athletic individuals (age 20-26) diagnosed with chronic patellar tendinopathy (symptom range 3-months to 4 years) based on musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK/US) and clinical diagnosis. Subjects received 3 PRP injections over of 6-weeks. Pain, tenderness, and the patient specific functional scale (PSFS)) were assessed at baseline, 2-weeks, 1- and 3-months. Global rating of change (GROC) and tendon morphology using MSK/US was assessed at 2 weeks, 1- and 3 months following initial intervention. Results. At the 3- month follow-up all subjects demonstrated improvement on MSK/US with decreased thickening hypoechogenicity of tendon fibers. Average pain changed from a mean 4/10 to 1/10 with 4 subjects having complete resolution of tenderness. Functionalsport impairments improved from a mean 60% perceived limitation to 10% on the PSFS. The GROC identified self-perceived improvement among all participants. Conclusion. A 3-injection PRP intervention improved pain, tenderness, and function to a level that satisfied minimum clinically important differences with MSK/US images supporting overall healing. Grants. The authors would like to acknowledge the Nova Southeastern University President’s Faculty Research and Development Grant as well as the Health Professions Division, Faculty Research Grant for providing funding.