Event Title

STATE LAWS REGULATING PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ABUSE AND DIVERSION: A REVIEW

Location

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. To identify studies that examine the effects of these state laws on outcomes including prescribing patterns, provider and patient behaviors, drug overdose deaths, substance abuse treatment admissions, drug diversion, and drug poison exposures. Background. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recently classified prescription drug abuse, especially prescription opioid abuse, as an epidemic. Over the years, states have enacted different laws in an effort to regulate and mitigate prescription drug abuse and diversion. The CDC has identified eight law categories that could potentially reduce this epidemic: Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, Physical Examination laws, tamper-resistant prescription forms laws, pain clinics regulations, prescription drug time and dosage limit laws, doctor shopping laws, patient identification laws, and immunity laws. Methods. We searched Embase, LexisNexis, and Google Scholar for the period between September/2014 and July/ 2015 for research articles that examine the effectiveness of state laws regulating prescription drug abuse and diversion. Results. Several articles evaluate the effectiveness of PDMPs. The data suggests that PDMPs are an effective state strategy in regulating prescription drugs abuse and its negative consequences. Only four studies examine the other state laws. Pain clinic and tamper-proof prescription laws are effective in decreasing opioids prescription, and overdose death rates. Also, pain clinic laws seem to reduce drug diversion. Conclusion. Data on the effectiveness of these state policies is scarce and inconsistent. Comprehensive evaluations of the impact of these laws are needed. Grants. None

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

STATE LAWS REGULATING PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ABUSE AND DIVERSION: A REVIEW

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Objective. To identify studies that examine the effects of these state laws on outcomes including prescribing patterns, provider and patient behaviors, drug overdose deaths, substance abuse treatment admissions, drug diversion, and drug poison exposures. Background. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recently classified prescription drug abuse, especially prescription opioid abuse, as an epidemic. Over the years, states have enacted different laws in an effort to regulate and mitigate prescription drug abuse and diversion. The CDC has identified eight law categories that could potentially reduce this epidemic: Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, Physical Examination laws, tamper-resistant prescription forms laws, pain clinics regulations, prescription drug time and dosage limit laws, doctor shopping laws, patient identification laws, and immunity laws. Methods. We searched Embase, LexisNexis, and Google Scholar for the period between September/2014 and July/ 2015 for research articles that examine the effectiveness of state laws regulating prescription drug abuse and diversion. Results. Several articles evaluate the effectiveness of PDMPs. The data suggests that PDMPs are an effective state strategy in regulating prescription drugs abuse and its negative consequences. Only four studies examine the other state laws. Pain clinic and tamper-proof prescription laws are effective in decreasing opioids prescription, and overdose death rates. Also, pain clinic laws seem to reduce drug diversion. Conclusion. Data on the effectiveness of these state policies is scarce and inconsistent. Comprehensive evaluations of the impact of these laws are needed. Grants. None