Event Title

A CASE STUDY COMPARISON OF DIFFICULT AND SMOOTH NURSING HOME PLACEMENT TRANSITIONS

Location

UPP 116

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. This case study analysis was conducted as part of larger research study to explore the challenges associated with the nursing home placement process for family caregivers of older adults Background. Family caregivers provide essential assistance to older adults who are unable to complete daily activities due to cognitive and/or functional impairment. Caregivers report difficulty balancing the extensive needs of their family members with other life responsibilities and may have to consider nursing home placement. Caregivers describe emotional and situational challenges with nursing home placement and need practical information to encourage a smooth transition. Methods. This case study report utilized the interview data from two caregivers who participated in a larger qualitative study of 10 primary family caregivers involved in the nursing home placement of an older family member. The cases exemplified a smooth and a difficult transition. Results. Four major contextual issues summarized the differences between the smooth and difficult transition: the caregiver’s relationship, the circumstances surrounding placement, support systems, and continued involvement post-placement. The primary family caregiver eventually made the nursing home placement decision when they were no longer able to manage caregiving circumstances at home. The assistance of their family and the nursing home staff greatly influenced the ease of the transition. Conclusion. Caregivers face great challenges. Nursing home staff have opportunities to improve the transition with nursing home placement and can ultimately improve the quality of life for both the caregiver and older family member. Grants. This study was funded by the University of Illinois at Chicago Chancellor’s Education Award Fund; Illinois Area Health Centers Network, Health Professions Student/Fellowship Grant; Midwest Nursing Research Society Dissertation Research Grant; Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Lambda Chapter Research Award; and the University of Illinois at Chicago Seth and Denise Rosen Research Award.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

A CASE STUDY COMPARISON OF DIFFICULT AND SMOOTH NURSING HOME PLACEMENT TRANSITIONS

UPP 116

Objective. This case study analysis was conducted as part of larger research study to explore the challenges associated with the nursing home placement process for family caregivers of older adults Background. Family caregivers provide essential assistance to older adults who are unable to complete daily activities due to cognitive and/or functional impairment. Caregivers report difficulty balancing the extensive needs of their family members with other life responsibilities and may have to consider nursing home placement. Caregivers describe emotional and situational challenges with nursing home placement and need practical information to encourage a smooth transition. Methods. This case study report utilized the interview data from two caregivers who participated in a larger qualitative study of 10 primary family caregivers involved in the nursing home placement of an older family member. The cases exemplified a smooth and a difficult transition. Results. Four major contextual issues summarized the differences between the smooth and difficult transition: the caregiver’s relationship, the circumstances surrounding placement, support systems, and continued involvement post-placement. The primary family caregiver eventually made the nursing home placement decision when they were no longer able to manage caregiving circumstances at home. The assistance of their family and the nursing home staff greatly influenced the ease of the transition. Conclusion. Caregivers face great challenges. Nursing home staff have opportunities to improve the transition with nursing home placement and can ultimately improve the quality of life for both the caregiver and older family member. Grants. This study was funded by the University of Illinois at Chicago Chancellor’s Education Award Fund; Illinois Area Health Centers Network, Health Professions Student/Fellowship Grant; Midwest Nursing Research Society Dissertation Research Grant; Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Lambda Chapter Research Award; and the University of Illinois at Chicago Seth and Denise Rosen Research Award.