Event Title

ENTRY-LEVEL EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN AND OUT OF ACADEMIA—STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS FOLLOWING FULL TIME CLINICAL EXPERIENCES

Location

Terry Auditorium

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. The purpose of this part of the study was to determine the how the student’s final full time clinical experiences affected the student’s knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice. Background. Using evidence to inform clinical decision-making is an important skill in a physical therapist’s arsenal of treatment tools. However, there is little research concerning how those outcomes are affected by what is experienced in the clinic during clinical rotations. Methods. Nine students were randomly chosen and agreed to participate in a focus group to explore student perceptions towards EBP following their final clinical experiences. Results. Three major themes were identified from the focus group: 1) Foundational knowledge of EBO during didactic education can promote confidence and enhance communication with the patient and CI, 2) Clinical experience enhances the value of EBP from their perspective, and 3) Contextual issues influence application of EBP in a clinical setting, including both academic and clinical factors. Students recognized the value of EBP in promoting the best practice, noting that responsibility for such rests with the individual PT clinicians. Conclusion. This study suggested students value their academic EBP courses and show a greater appreciation for EBP following clinical experiences, noting the positive impact on clinical reasoning and patient outcomes. Grants. This study was funded by a grant from NSU HPD Research Committee and the Physical Therapy Department.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

ENTRY-LEVEL EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN AND OUT OF ACADEMIA—STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS FOLLOWING FULL TIME CLINICAL EXPERIENCES

Terry Auditorium

Objective. The purpose of this part of the study was to determine the how the student’s final full time clinical experiences affected the student’s knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice. Background. Using evidence to inform clinical decision-making is an important skill in a physical therapist’s arsenal of treatment tools. However, there is little research concerning how those outcomes are affected by what is experienced in the clinic during clinical rotations. Methods. Nine students were randomly chosen and agreed to participate in a focus group to explore student perceptions towards EBP following their final clinical experiences. Results. Three major themes were identified from the focus group: 1) Foundational knowledge of EBO during didactic education can promote confidence and enhance communication with the patient and CI, 2) Clinical experience enhances the value of EBP from their perspective, and 3) Contextual issues influence application of EBP in a clinical setting, including both academic and clinical factors. Students recognized the value of EBP in promoting the best practice, noting that responsibility for such rests with the individual PT clinicians. Conclusion. This study suggested students value their academic EBP courses and show a greater appreciation for EBP following clinical experiences, noting the positive impact on clinical reasoning and patient outcomes. Grants. This study was funded by a grant from NSU HPD Research Committee and the Physical Therapy Department.