Event Title

CHILDREN’S EXPOSURE TO SECONDHAND SMOKE, PARENTAL NICOTINE DEPENDENCE AND MOTIVATION TO QUIT SMOKING

Location

Resnick Auditorium

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. The extent of children’s exposure to second hand smoke, the most frequent sites for exposure, the degree of the parents’ dependence on nicotine, and their level of motivation to stop smoking were measured. Comparisons were made between income levels and ethnic/racial groups. Background. More than 600,000 people die each year as a result of exposure to secondhand smoke; 28% of those deaths are children. Methods. This descriptive, correlational study used data provided by a convenience sample of 184 smoking parental-figures representing 376 children recruited in community settings. Potential subjects were approached by the researchers in public places as train stations, shopping centers, and grocery store parking lots. Individuals that reported being smokers were asked if they had children and if they would volunteer to complete the research instrument. Results. Children’s exposure to secondhand smoke was low; Asian children had the highest likelihood of exposure. The areas of most frequent exposure were multiunit residential communities and in a vehicle. The parents’ dependence on nicotine was moderately high and parental motivation to quit smoking was high. However, those parents who were the most dependent on nicotine were the least motivated to quit. Conclusions. Nurses working with both adult and pediatric populations should address the opportunities for exposure to secondhand smoke for their patient population. Community health nurses should specifically target workplaces, businesses and communities with high numbers of Asian residents for public health education related to childhood exposure to secondhand smoke

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

CHILDREN’S EXPOSURE TO SECONDHAND SMOKE, PARENTAL NICOTINE DEPENDENCE AND MOTIVATION TO QUIT SMOKING

Resnick Auditorium

Objective. The extent of children’s exposure to second hand smoke, the most frequent sites for exposure, the degree of the parents’ dependence on nicotine, and their level of motivation to stop smoking were measured. Comparisons were made between income levels and ethnic/racial groups. Background. More than 600,000 people die each year as a result of exposure to secondhand smoke; 28% of those deaths are children. Methods. This descriptive, correlational study used data provided by a convenience sample of 184 smoking parental-figures representing 376 children recruited in community settings. Potential subjects were approached by the researchers in public places as train stations, shopping centers, and grocery store parking lots. Individuals that reported being smokers were asked if they had children and if they would volunteer to complete the research instrument. Results. Children’s exposure to secondhand smoke was low; Asian children had the highest likelihood of exposure. The areas of most frequent exposure were multiunit residential communities and in a vehicle. The parents’ dependence on nicotine was moderately high and parental motivation to quit smoking was high. However, those parents who were the most dependent on nicotine were the least motivated to quit. Conclusions. Nurses working with both adult and pediatric populations should address the opportunities for exposure to secondhand smoke for their patient population. Community health nurses should specifically target workplaces, businesses and communities with high numbers of Asian residents for public health education related to childhood exposure to secondhand smoke