Presentation Title

FACE AND NECK SKIN FIRMNESS AND WATER CONTENT ASSESSED IN YOUNG WOMEN

Location

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. Goals were to (1) test the hypothesis that skin hydration directly correlates with skin firmness and (2) develop skin water-firmness data to later assess age-related changes. Background. Stratum corneum water measurements suggest linkages between skin’s mechanical properties and water content but the role of dermal water is unknown. Methods. Dermal water was assessed by tissue dielectric constant (TDC) at 300 MHz to 0.5 and 2.0 mm depths on four face sites and two forearm sites of 28 women (25.1±1.7 years). Skin firmness was determined by the FORCE (mN) needed to indent skin 1.3 mm. Skin firmness was also measured at two neck sites and total body water % (TBW) and fat % (TBF) were measured. Results. Among face sites, FORCE varied and averaged 33.6±7.2 mN with neck and forearm values of 28.2±9.1 and 58.4±18.9 mN. TDC averages varied by face site with averages of 35.4±3.8 at 0.5 mm and 37.2±4.1 at 2.0 mm depths. Forearm TDC values were less (p<0.001) being 31.4±4.1 and 27.1±4.3 for 0.5 and 2.0 mm depths respectively. Regression analysis showed an inverse correlation between FORCE and TDC on forearm but not face. Forearm and face TDC values correlated with TBW and inversely with TBF. Conclusion. Face and forearm skin water- skin-firmness relationships are different with none for face but a negative correlation for forearm. Although this is only partially consistent with the hypothesis the skin firmness data for face, neck and forearm for this young female group should provide reference data for subsequent comparisons of possible age affects. Grants. None

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

FACE AND NECK SKIN FIRMNESS AND WATER CONTENT ASSESSED IN YOUNG WOMEN

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Objective. Goals were to (1) test the hypothesis that skin hydration directly correlates with skin firmness and (2) develop skin water-firmness data to later assess age-related changes. Background. Stratum corneum water measurements suggest linkages between skin’s mechanical properties and water content but the role of dermal water is unknown. Methods. Dermal water was assessed by tissue dielectric constant (TDC) at 300 MHz to 0.5 and 2.0 mm depths on four face sites and two forearm sites of 28 women (25.1±1.7 years). Skin firmness was determined by the FORCE (mN) needed to indent skin 1.3 mm. Skin firmness was also measured at two neck sites and total body water % (TBW) and fat % (TBF) were measured. Results. Among face sites, FORCE varied and averaged 33.6±7.2 mN with neck and forearm values of 28.2±9.1 and 58.4±18.9 mN. TDC averages varied by face site with averages of 35.4±3.8 at 0.5 mm and 37.2±4.1 at 2.0 mm depths. Forearm TDC values were less (p<0.001) being 31.4±4.1 and 27.1±4.3 for 0.5 and 2.0 mm depths respectively. Regression analysis showed an inverse correlation between FORCE and TDC on forearm but not face. Forearm and face TDC values correlated with TBW and inversely with TBF. Conclusion. Face and forearm skin water- skin-firmness relationships are different with none for face but a negative correlation for forearm. Although this is only partially consistent with the hypothesis the skin firmness data for face, neck and forearm for this young female group should provide reference data for subsequent comparisons of possible age affects. Grants. None