Presentation Title

INFLUENCES OF FIRST-YEAR OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL STUDENTS’ READINESS TO UTILIZE HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Location

Steele Auditorium

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. Objective. This study was conducted to determine osteopathic medical students’ (OMS) attitudes toward health information technologies (HIT) used in medical practice and how these factors might influence their readiness to utilize HIT in future practice. Background. Background. Attitudes towards HIT may influence medical students’ successful adoption, willingness to learn, and utilization of HIT tools to improve patient outcomes. Yet scarce information is available on which factors influence students’ readiness for HIT engagement and utilization prior to clinical training. Methods. Methods. A cross-sectional study using validated measures was conducted via pen-and-paper questionnaire administered to first-year l OMS (2015). Multivariate regression modeling was used to determine if knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and personal characteristics will predict OMS’ readiness to utilize HIT tools in future practice. Results. Results. A multivariate linear regression was calculated using SPSS to predict HIT readiness in students (N=474) based on gender, age, HIT knowledge, IT self-efficacy, attitudes toward HIT, and IT utilization. A significant regression equation was found, F(6, 368) = 27.77, p<.001, R2 (adjusted) of .250. Greater IT self-efficacy when using computer technology, higher scores on openness to change, more favorable attitudes toward HIT utilization, younger age, and being male were associated with readiness to utilize HIT in future practice. Conclusion. Conclusion. Innovative approaches to HIT education and design an Internet-age medical school curriculum that has medical informatics woven into its fabric are needed using specially designed classrooms where students are motivated, and not merely instructed, to learn how to use HIT technologies. Grants. Grants. This study was funded by a grant from the HPD Research Fund.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

INFLUENCES OF FIRST-YEAR OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL STUDENTS’ READINESS TO UTILIZE HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Steele Auditorium

Objective. Objective. This study was conducted to determine osteopathic medical students’ (OMS) attitudes toward health information technologies (HIT) used in medical practice and how these factors might influence their readiness to utilize HIT in future practice. Background. Background. Attitudes towards HIT may influence medical students’ successful adoption, willingness to learn, and utilization of HIT tools to improve patient outcomes. Yet scarce information is available on which factors influence students’ readiness for HIT engagement and utilization prior to clinical training. Methods. Methods. A cross-sectional study using validated measures was conducted via pen-and-paper questionnaire administered to first-year l OMS (2015). Multivariate regression modeling was used to determine if knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and personal characteristics will predict OMS’ readiness to utilize HIT tools in future practice. Results. Results. A multivariate linear regression was calculated using SPSS to predict HIT readiness in students (N=474) based on gender, age, HIT knowledge, IT self-efficacy, attitudes toward HIT, and IT utilization. A significant regression equation was found, F(6, 368) = 27.77, p<.001, R2 (adjusted) of .250. Greater IT self-efficacy when using computer technology, higher scores on openness to change, more favorable attitudes toward HIT utilization, younger age, and being male were associated with readiness to utilize HIT in future practice. Conclusion. Conclusion. Innovative approaches to HIT education and design an Internet-age medical school curriculum that has medical informatics woven into its fabric are needed using specially designed classrooms where students are motivated, and not merely instructed, to learn how to use HIT technologies. Grants. Grants. This study was funded by a grant from the HPD Research Fund.