Event Title

IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE IN A PATIENT WITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Location

Atrium

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Description

Introduction. The Center for Disease Control reports that at least 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBI) occur every year. In 2000, the United States incurred $76.5 billion dollars in medical and other related costs such as loss of productivity. Case presentation. A 44 year old Caucasian Veteran male presented with complaints of extreme photophobia, abnormal gait and mobility, and visual discomfort with prolonged near work. He had previously been diagnosed with TBI at a local VA Medical Center. Following a comprehensive eye exam, a TBI evaluation was performed. Appropriate tinted lenses were prescribed, single vision spectacles for distance and near vision were given, and vision therapy was initiated to address his binocular and accommodative deficits. Deviation From the Expected. Despite previous routine eye care, our patient continued to be symptomatic which profoundly impacted his quality of life. With appropriate referral and diagnostic testing, an adequate treatment plan was implemented successfully addressing his presenting complaints. Discussion. Typically, presbyopic patients do well with bifocal or progressive spectacles. In patients with TBI, however, these types of lenses are contraindicated secondary to possible lens distortions which may negatively impact gait and mobility. As opposed to conventional sunglasses, these patients respond to particular tint colors and densities to successfully remediate symptoms of photophobia. Conclusion. Interdisciplinary management and communication between all disciplines, such as neuroophthalmology, psychology or psychiatry, and cognitive and rehabilitation therapy is essential for the well-being of our patients presenting with TBI. Grants. N/A

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE IN A PATIENT WITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Atrium

Introduction. The Center for Disease Control reports that at least 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBI) occur every year. In 2000, the United States incurred $76.5 billion dollars in medical and other related costs such as loss of productivity. Case presentation. A 44 year old Caucasian Veteran male presented with complaints of extreme photophobia, abnormal gait and mobility, and visual discomfort with prolonged near work. He had previously been diagnosed with TBI at a local VA Medical Center. Following a comprehensive eye exam, a TBI evaluation was performed. Appropriate tinted lenses were prescribed, single vision spectacles for distance and near vision were given, and vision therapy was initiated to address his binocular and accommodative deficits. Deviation From the Expected. Despite previous routine eye care, our patient continued to be symptomatic which profoundly impacted his quality of life. With appropriate referral and diagnostic testing, an adequate treatment plan was implemented successfully addressing his presenting complaints. Discussion. Typically, presbyopic patients do well with bifocal or progressive spectacles. In patients with TBI, however, these types of lenses are contraindicated secondary to possible lens distortions which may negatively impact gait and mobility. As opposed to conventional sunglasses, these patients respond to particular tint colors and densities to successfully remediate symptoms of photophobia. Conclusion. Interdisciplinary management and communication between all disciplines, such as neuroophthalmology, psychology or psychiatry, and cognitive and rehabilitation therapy is essential for the well-being of our patients presenting with TBI. Grants. N/A