Presentation Title

DIFFERENTIATING RETINAL TUMORS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Location

UPP 113

Format

Event

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Abstract

Introduction. Encountering a retinal tumor is extremely rare, and on occasions when one is stumbled upon during fundus examination, most cases are benign. Tumors arising in the retina have their origins in retinal cells, which include retinocytes and glial cells, the retinal vasculature, or the retinal pigment epithelium. This presentation will provide an overview of the retinal tumors including description, presentation, and proper diagnosis and treatment. With the majority of these tumors having a strong association with a genetic condition, the need for early detection and management is critical to ensure the best prognosis for these patients. Case presentation. Our patient presented 40 to the clinic for a comprehensive eye examination stating no visual or ocular complaints. Visual acuities were 20/20 OD, OS and anterior segment was unremarkable. Upon fundus biomicroscopy, a calcified, yellowish, raised lesion was noted adjacent to the optic nerve head in the right eye. Fundus photography, OCT, HVF, and B-scan were performed to best determine and manage this condition. Deviation From the Expected. No deviation from expected for this case. Discussion. Different types of retinal tumors will be discussed in detail, including description and presentation, managament, and extensive systemic workup testing if indicated. Conclusion. It was determined that our patient presented with a unilateral, single astrocytoma of the right eye. Photos, OCT, and HVF were taken as baseline to compare for future management of this condition. No systemic workup testing was performed. Grants. No grants were obtained.

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

DIFFERENTIATING RETINAL TUMORS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

UPP 113

Introduction. Encountering a retinal tumor is extremely rare, and on occasions when one is stumbled upon during fundus examination, most cases are benign. Tumors arising in the retina have their origins in retinal cells, which include retinocytes and glial cells, the retinal vasculature, or the retinal pigment epithelium. This presentation will provide an overview of the retinal tumors including description, presentation, and proper diagnosis and treatment. With the majority of these tumors having a strong association with a genetic condition, the need for early detection and management is critical to ensure the best prognosis for these patients. Case presentation. Our patient presented 40 to the clinic for a comprehensive eye examination stating no visual or ocular complaints. Visual acuities were 20/20 OD, OS and anterior segment was unremarkable. Upon fundus biomicroscopy, a calcified, yellowish, raised lesion was noted adjacent to the optic nerve head in the right eye. Fundus photography, OCT, HVF, and B-scan were performed to best determine and manage this condition. Deviation From the Expected. No deviation from expected for this case. Discussion. Different types of retinal tumors will be discussed in detail, including description and presentation, managament, and extensive systemic workup testing if indicated. Conclusion. It was determined that our patient presented with a unilateral, single astrocytoma of the right eye. Photos, OCT, and HVF were taken as baseline to compare for future management of this condition. No systemic workup testing was performed. Grants. No grants were obtained.