Presentation Title

THE EVOLVING FACE OF MS; NEW PRESENTATIONS, NEW PROGNOSIS, NEW PERCEPTIONS.

Location

UPP 113

Format

Event

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Abstract

Introduction. We are taught to follow rule books, recipes, and manuals to complete tasks effectively. However, in medicine, we often need reminders to think 'outside the box.' Sometimes the most simple cases can be missed because we are troubled with the deviation from the expected presentation. This discussion will illustrate a case that was overlooked for months, with a prognosis that only a few years ago, would have been a hopeless cause. Case presentation. A 27 year old healthy female, marathon and triathlon athlete presents with an isolated disturbance lasting approximately one month upon flexion of the neck. The female experienced a shock-like sensation down both legs with the movement. No other symptoms existed including any evidence of weakness, fatigue, or loss of sensation. No trauma was associated as well. Deviation From the Expected. The most common presenting sign of Multiple Sclerosis, MS is unilateral vision loss (from optic neuritis) or transient muscle weakness, paralysis, or neuropathy in an extremity. The symptom the female experienced was L'Hermittes sign, often associated with late stages of MS. This is very rarely the presenting symptom. Discussion. As upcoming clinicians and health care participants, it's so critical to understand that patients are not always going to present with "textbook" presentations of diseases. Furthermore, the prognosis, treatments, and perceptions of MS has changed dramatically over the last few years. Conclusion. We must be reminded that not all cases present with a orderly pattern. Many are missing several pieces of the puzzle, and it is up to us to decipher what the greater picture is. MS has drastically changed in its disease progression thanks to the life changing disease modifying agents. As awareness and knowledge grows, so will with perception of MS. The promise of "New Face" to MS is no longer a hope, it's a reality. Grants. No grants have been provided for this presentation.

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

THE EVOLVING FACE OF MS; NEW PRESENTATIONS, NEW PROGNOSIS, NEW PERCEPTIONS.

UPP 113

Introduction. We are taught to follow rule books, recipes, and manuals to complete tasks effectively. However, in medicine, we often need reminders to think 'outside the box.' Sometimes the most simple cases can be missed because we are troubled with the deviation from the expected presentation. This discussion will illustrate a case that was overlooked for months, with a prognosis that only a few years ago, would have been a hopeless cause. Case presentation. A 27 year old healthy female, marathon and triathlon athlete presents with an isolated disturbance lasting approximately one month upon flexion of the neck. The female experienced a shock-like sensation down both legs with the movement. No other symptoms existed including any evidence of weakness, fatigue, or loss of sensation. No trauma was associated as well. Deviation From the Expected. The most common presenting sign of Multiple Sclerosis, MS is unilateral vision loss (from optic neuritis) or transient muscle weakness, paralysis, or neuropathy in an extremity. The symptom the female experienced was L'Hermittes sign, often associated with late stages of MS. This is very rarely the presenting symptom. Discussion. As upcoming clinicians and health care participants, it's so critical to understand that patients are not always going to present with "textbook" presentations of diseases. Furthermore, the prognosis, treatments, and perceptions of MS has changed dramatically over the last few years. Conclusion. We must be reminded that not all cases present with a orderly pattern. Many are missing several pieces of the puzzle, and it is up to us to decipher what the greater picture is. MS has drastically changed in its disease progression thanks to the life changing disease modifying agents. As awareness and knowledge grows, so will with perception of MS. The promise of "New Face" to MS is no longer a hope, it's a reality. Grants. No grants have been provided for this presentation.