Event Title

HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION THROUGH INTERDISCIPLINARY FACULTY EDUCATION

Location

Terry Auditorium

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. To develop an innovative victim-centered, human trafficking education program that motivated faculty in the Colleges of Health Care Sciences and Nursing to integrate human trafficking into existing curricula. Background. Human trafficking is a complex public health crisis. Interdisciplinary healthcare education that increases awareness is required to combat modern day slavery. Faculty need assessment and a review of collegewide curricula determined that human trafficking was absent from every course. This educational program was designed specifically to address that healthcare training need. Methods. The presenters developed human trafficking curriculum grounded in adult learning theory and the transtheoretical model of change (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983). Four training modules were presented by experts on human trafficking from medicine, law enforcement, victims support agencies, and farmworkers' advocates. The modules included: human trafficking overview, victims' healthcare needs, developmental and cultural factors in the screening of victims, and instructional strategies for faculty. Results. Modules post-test scores showed a measurable increase in facultys' awareness of human trafficking. Outcome surveys revealed that 100% of the participants were willing to include human trafficking in their curriculum. Qualitative data confirmed that faculty gained knowledge of human trafficking and learned new skills to identify victims. Conclusion. Healthcare professionals need appropriate training to help victims of human trafficking. Current and future healthcare professionals knowledgeable in the signs and symptoms of human trafficking can reduce criminalization of victims and refer victims to appropriate health and social services. Grants. This study was funded by Nova Southeastern University 2011-2012 President's Faculty Research and Development grant.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION THROUGH INTERDISCIPLINARY FACULTY EDUCATION

Terry Auditorium

Objective. To develop an innovative victim-centered, human trafficking education program that motivated faculty in the Colleges of Health Care Sciences and Nursing to integrate human trafficking into existing curricula. Background. Human trafficking is a complex public health crisis. Interdisciplinary healthcare education that increases awareness is required to combat modern day slavery. Faculty need assessment and a review of collegewide curricula determined that human trafficking was absent from every course. This educational program was designed specifically to address that healthcare training need. Methods. The presenters developed human trafficking curriculum grounded in adult learning theory and the transtheoretical model of change (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983). Four training modules were presented by experts on human trafficking from medicine, law enforcement, victims support agencies, and farmworkers' advocates. The modules included: human trafficking overview, victims' healthcare needs, developmental and cultural factors in the screening of victims, and instructional strategies for faculty. Results. Modules post-test scores showed a measurable increase in facultys' awareness of human trafficking. Outcome surveys revealed that 100% of the participants were willing to include human trafficking in their curriculum. Qualitative data confirmed that faculty gained knowledge of human trafficking and learned new skills to identify victims. Conclusion. Healthcare professionals need appropriate training to help victims of human trafficking. Current and future healthcare professionals knowledgeable in the signs and symptoms of human trafficking can reduce criminalization of victims and refer victims to appropriate health and social services. Grants. This study was funded by Nova Southeastern University 2011-2012 President's Faculty Research and Development grant.