Event Title

FEMALE PHARMACISTS IN LEADERSHIP ROLES IN ACADEMIA

Location

Auditorium A

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. To examine the percentage of females and males in leadership roles in academia. Background. Research shows that females now make up the majority of pharmacy graduates. Despite more females entering the profession of pharmacy, the percentage in leadership roles is still low. Methods. This evaluative study was conducted using retrospective data from The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Profile of Pharmacy Faculty for 2007-2008 and 2012-2013 academic years. Data pertaining to the number of women in various academic and administrative ranks were extracted and classified to compare the percentage between females and males. Additional analyses include the comparisons between male and female classified as full-time or part time, as well as race and ethnicity. Data from the two academic years will be compared to determine if any changes have occurred over time amongst females and males in academic leadership roles. Results. Overall, analyses of comparison of full-time and part-time roles in 2007-2008 show that males held more leadership roles than females (68% vs 32%).The 2012-2013 analyses show an increase in females in full-time leadership roles(39%) compared to males (61%) . Part time roles were equally distributed for both male and females in 2012-2013, showing an increase since 2007-2008 (54% vs 45%). Males also held more leadership roles across departments of pharmacy with the exception of Continuing Professional Education and Pharmacy Practice. Conclusion. Females who hold leadership roles in academia have increased; however, males are still at a higher percentage than females. Grants. N/A

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

FEMALE PHARMACISTS IN LEADERSHIP ROLES IN ACADEMIA

Auditorium A

Objective. To examine the percentage of females and males in leadership roles in academia. Background. Research shows that females now make up the majority of pharmacy graduates. Despite more females entering the profession of pharmacy, the percentage in leadership roles is still low. Methods. This evaluative study was conducted using retrospective data from The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Profile of Pharmacy Faculty for 2007-2008 and 2012-2013 academic years. Data pertaining to the number of women in various academic and administrative ranks were extracted and classified to compare the percentage between females and males. Additional analyses include the comparisons between male and female classified as full-time or part time, as well as race and ethnicity. Data from the two academic years will be compared to determine if any changes have occurred over time amongst females and males in academic leadership roles. Results. Overall, analyses of comparison of full-time and part-time roles in 2007-2008 show that males held more leadership roles than females (68% vs 32%).The 2012-2013 analyses show an increase in females in full-time leadership roles(39%) compared to males (61%) . Part time roles were equally distributed for both male and females in 2012-2013, showing an increase since 2007-2008 (54% vs 45%). Males also held more leadership roles across departments of pharmacy with the exception of Continuing Professional Education and Pharmacy Practice. Conclusion. Females who hold leadership roles in academia have increased; however, males are still at a higher percentage than females. Grants. N/A