Presentation Title

ATTITUDE AND EMPOWERMENT AS PREDICTORS OF DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT AMONG AFRICAN-AMERICANS

Location

Morris Auditorium

Format

Event

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. The objective of this study is to examine and describe attitude and perceived behavioral control, and to test these as predictors of diabetes self-care practices among African-American individuals. Background. Diabetes is a disease that is increasing in society and is affecting the African-American population disproportionately. The ill effects of diabetes and associated costs can be reduced through self-care techniques. However, such techniques appear to be inconsistently practiced and at an alarmingly low rate among the African-American population. Methods. This is a non-experimental, descriptive, correlational study wherein data were collected from a convenience sample of 100 African-American individuals with diabetes living in South Florida. Survey data were collected using previously developed and tested instruments; physical data consist of A1C measures. Statistical tests include descriptives, multiple linear regression and nonparametric bivariate correlation. Results. Among this sample, diabetes empowerment is strongly predictive of self-care activities but attitude towards diabetes is not. The relationship between self-care activities and A1C is inverse but not significant. Conclusion. Participants' perception of their understanding of diabetes, its treatment, and their engagement in self-care activities is high but not corroborated by their body mass index or A1C values. A1C testing, as compared to blood glucose testing, is not well understood by this sample. Patients with diabetes should receive diabetes education and this education should include frequent reinforcement of appropriate self-care activities. Grants. This research was funded by Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division Research Grant.

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

ATTITUDE AND EMPOWERMENT AS PREDICTORS OF DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT AMONG AFRICAN-AMERICANS

Morris Auditorium

Objective. The objective of this study is to examine and describe attitude and perceived behavioral control, and to test these as predictors of diabetes self-care practices among African-American individuals. Background. Diabetes is a disease that is increasing in society and is affecting the African-American population disproportionately. The ill effects of diabetes and associated costs can be reduced through self-care techniques. However, such techniques appear to be inconsistently practiced and at an alarmingly low rate among the African-American population. Methods. This is a non-experimental, descriptive, correlational study wherein data were collected from a convenience sample of 100 African-American individuals with diabetes living in South Florida. Survey data were collected using previously developed and tested instruments; physical data consist of A1C measures. Statistical tests include descriptives, multiple linear regression and nonparametric bivariate correlation. Results. Among this sample, diabetes empowerment is strongly predictive of self-care activities but attitude towards diabetes is not. The relationship between self-care activities and A1C is inverse but not significant. Conclusion. Participants' perception of their understanding of diabetes, its treatment, and their engagement in self-care activities is high but not corroborated by their body mass index or A1C values. A1C testing, as compared to blood glucose testing, is not well understood by this sample. Patients with diabetes should receive diabetes education and this education should include frequent reinforcement of appropriate self-care activities. Grants. This research was funded by Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division Research Grant.