Event Title

CHANGES IN FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN SCORES OVER A SEASON IN COLLEGIATE SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL ATHLETES

Location

Hull Auditorium

Start Date

14-2-2014 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. The purpose of this study was to document the changes in functional movement patterns over a competitive season. Background. Changes in functional movement patterns have been identified as predictors of athletic injury, a topic that has recently seen significant interest in the literature. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a screening tool for the musculoskeletal system that has been shown to have validity in identifying individuals who may be at risk for athletic injury. Changes in many aspects of physical capacity and athletic performance have been documented through the course of a competitive season in collegiate athletes. To date, changes in FMS test scores through a competitive season have not been identified. Methods. Fifty-seven NCAA Division II athletes were screened using the FMS as part of the pre and post participation examination for their compeFiftytitive seasons in 2012. Composite and individual FMS test scores for the pre and post season were compared to identify significant changes. The scores were also analyzed for changes in the number of asymmetries present and the frequency of a score of one in any of the tests. Results. There were no significant interactions in the main effects for time or sport in the composite FMS scores. However, four individual tests did show significant change. The deep squat (Z=-3.260, p=.001) and inline lunge scores (Z=-3.498, p < .001) improved across all athletes, and the active straight leg raise (Z=-2.496, p=.013) and rotary stability scores (Z=2.530, p=.011) worsened across all athletes. A reduction in the number of asymmetries (X2=4.258, p=.039) and scores of 1 (X2=26.148, p < .001) were also found. Conclusion. Changes in individual fundamental movement patterns occur through the course of a competitive season. Grants. No grants were used for this study

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Feb 14th, 12:00 AM

CHANGES IN FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN SCORES OVER A SEASON IN COLLEGIATE SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL ATHLETES

Hull Auditorium

Objective. The purpose of this study was to document the changes in functional movement patterns over a competitive season. Background. Changes in functional movement patterns have been identified as predictors of athletic injury, a topic that has recently seen significant interest in the literature. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a screening tool for the musculoskeletal system that has been shown to have validity in identifying individuals who may be at risk for athletic injury. Changes in many aspects of physical capacity and athletic performance have been documented through the course of a competitive season in collegiate athletes. To date, changes in FMS test scores through a competitive season have not been identified. Methods. Fifty-seven NCAA Division II athletes were screened using the FMS as part of the pre and post participation examination for their compeFiftytitive seasons in 2012. Composite and individual FMS test scores for the pre and post season were compared to identify significant changes. The scores were also analyzed for changes in the number of asymmetries present and the frequency of a score of one in any of the tests. Results. There were no significant interactions in the main effects for time or sport in the composite FMS scores. However, four individual tests did show significant change. The deep squat (Z=-3.260, p=.001) and inline lunge scores (Z=-3.498, p < .001) improved across all athletes, and the active straight leg raise (Z=-2.496, p=.013) and rotary stability scores (Z=2.530, p=.011) worsened across all athletes. A reduction in the number of asymmetries (X2=4.258, p=.039) and scores of 1 (X2=26.148, p < .001) were also found. Conclusion. Changes in individual fundamental movement patterns occur through the course of a competitive season. Grants. No grants were used for this study