Presentation Title

Detection of Incipient Lymphedema in Women Previously Treated for Breast Cancer via Non-Invasive Tissue Dielectric Constant Measurements

Format

Event

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. To determine the utility of tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurements to detect lymphedema in women previously treated for breast cancer. It was hypothesized that TDC values, as indices of local skin tissue water, would uncover incipient lymphedema for which there are not yet recognized symptoms. Background. These women are at-risk for developing treatment-related lymphedema but often lymphedema is not recognized until gross manifestations of swelling and functional limitations are present. Methods. In 46 women who were previously surgically-treated for unilateral breast cancer, at-risk and control arm volumes (VA and VC) were determined from girth measurements taken at 4cm intervals from wrist to axilla. Percentage edema volume (%EVOL) was determined as 100(VAVC)/ VC. Ages (mean±SD) were 63.3±11.3 years and surgery was 32.6±23.0 months prior to their evaluation. TDC was measured at 300 MHz bilaterally on the hand, forearm, biceps, shoulder and lateral thorax to a depth of 2.5mm. At-risk/control arm TDC ratios were determined for each site and compared in patient subsets grouped according to their %EVOL. Results. At the time of evaluation 34.9% had %EVOL > 5% and 15.2% had %EVOL > 10%. These levels are threshold-limits often used to define lymphedema presence. Bicep TDC ratios for patients with %EVOL below and above these thresholds were 0.993±0.082 vs. 1.210±0.376, p=0.006 (Mann-Whitney) for the 5% threshold and 1.009±0.099 vs. 1.396±0.508, p=0.027 for the 10% threshold. TDC ratios at no other site were significantly different between low and high %EVOL patient subsets. Conclusion. The biceps TDC ratio is indicative of a potentially useful lymphedema detection measure.

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Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

Detection of Incipient Lymphedema in Women Previously Treated for Breast Cancer via Non-Invasive Tissue Dielectric Constant Measurements

Objective. To determine the utility of tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurements to detect lymphedema in women previously treated for breast cancer. It was hypothesized that TDC values, as indices of local skin tissue water, would uncover incipient lymphedema for which there are not yet recognized symptoms. Background. These women are at-risk for developing treatment-related lymphedema but often lymphedema is not recognized until gross manifestations of swelling and functional limitations are present. Methods. In 46 women who were previously surgically-treated for unilateral breast cancer, at-risk and control arm volumes (VA and VC) were determined from girth measurements taken at 4cm intervals from wrist to axilla. Percentage edema volume (%EVOL) was determined as 100(VAVC)/ VC. Ages (mean±SD) were 63.3±11.3 years and surgery was 32.6±23.0 months prior to their evaluation. TDC was measured at 300 MHz bilaterally on the hand, forearm, biceps, shoulder and lateral thorax to a depth of 2.5mm. At-risk/control arm TDC ratios were determined for each site and compared in patient subsets grouped according to their %EVOL. Results. At the time of evaluation 34.9% had %EVOL > 5% and 15.2% had %EVOL > 10%. These levels are threshold-limits often used to define lymphedema presence. Bicep TDC ratios for patients with %EVOL below and above these thresholds were 0.993±0.082 vs. 1.210±0.376, p=0.006 (Mann-Whitney) for the 5% threshold and 1.009±0.099 vs. 1.396±0.508, p=0.027 for the 10% threshold. TDC ratios at no other site were significantly different between low and high %EVOL patient subsets. Conclusion. The biceps TDC ratio is indicative of a potentially useful lymphedema detection measure.