Presentation Title

The Relationship Between the Allen Cognitive Level Screen and Adverse Driving Incidents in Young Adults: A Pilot Study of the Predictive Validity

Format

Event

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. This study was conducted as a pilot validation study to determine the relationship between the Allen Cognitive Level Screen (ACLS) and adverse driving incidents in young adults. Background. Research has been conducted in the past that has shown validation for the ACLS when used to make discharge plans for individuals with cognitive deficits such as supervision needs. Although the ACLS is a commonly used cognitive assessment for occupational therapists, it has not been validated for measuring safe driving skills. There have been no studies that researched the relationship between ACLS scores and adverse driving incidents, such as being ticketed for moving violations or causing an accident. This lack of evidence has created a need for research in order to determine if the assessment should be used to make recommendations regarding driving for those clients with impairments. Methods. This study was a quasi-experimental pilot study for theory validation using predictive correlation design. It examined the relationship of a participant’s cognitive level as determined by the ACLS with the participant’s reported level of adverse driving incidents. Fifty college students participated in cognitive assessments via the ACLS and completed anonymous surveys indicating the number of adverse driving incidents they had caused in the past five years. Students were between the ages of 20 and 31, have driven for at least five 35 years, and attend a college in Central Florida. The cognitive levels and summation of adverse driving events were compared using Pearson product moment correlation. Results. Although there were positive correlations between the number of participant moving violation tickets and accidents, there was no statistically significant relationship found between participant ACLS cognitive level score and number of adverse driving incident. Conclusion. The ACLS was not been found to be an accurate predictor of adverse driving incidents in this study. Further research is indicated.

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Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

The Relationship Between the Allen Cognitive Level Screen and Adverse Driving Incidents in Young Adults: A Pilot Study of the Predictive Validity

Objective. This study was conducted as a pilot validation study to determine the relationship between the Allen Cognitive Level Screen (ACLS) and adverse driving incidents in young adults. Background. Research has been conducted in the past that has shown validation for the ACLS when used to make discharge plans for individuals with cognitive deficits such as supervision needs. Although the ACLS is a commonly used cognitive assessment for occupational therapists, it has not been validated for measuring safe driving skills. There have been no studies that researched the relationship between ACLS scores and adverse driving incidents, such as being ticketed for moving violations or causing an accident. This lack of evidence has created a need for research in order to determine if the assessment should be used to make recommendations regarding driving for those clients with impairments. Methods. This study was a quasi-experimental pilot study for theory validation using predictive correlation design. It examined the relationship of a participant’s cognitive level as determined by the ACLS with the participant’s reported level of adverse driving incidents. Fifty college students participated in cognitive assessments via the ACLS and completed anonymous surveys indicating the number of adverse driving incidents they had caused in the past five years. Students were between the ages of 20 and 31, have driven for at least five 35 years, and attend a college in Central Florida. The cognitive levels and summation of adverse driving events were compared using Pearson product moment correlation. Results. Although there were positive correlations between the number of participant moving violation tickets and accidents, there was no statistically significant relationship found between participant ACLS cognitive level score and number of adverse driving incident. Conclusion. The ACLS was not been found to be an accurate predictor of adverse driving incidents in this study. Further research is indicated.