Event Title

Predictors of Florida Pharmacists’ Motivation to Work at Their Primary Place of Employment

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. The study purpose was to examine important predictors of active full-time Florida pharmacists’ motivation to work at their primary place of employment. Background. As the pharmacy profession moves towards more patient-centered care, it is important to determine how this current nationwide trend impacts Florida pharmacists’ motivation to work. Methods. Using a cross-sectional descriptive survey design, 2,400 pharmacists with active licenses in Florida were mailed a 4-page questionnaire about work characteristics such as practice setting, patient care services offered, actual time spent on patient care, workload level, and motivation to work at their primary place of employment. Additionally, pharmacists’ personal information such as age, gender, position and employment status were collected. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Linear regression analysis was conducted to determine significant predictors of pharmacists’ motivation to work (p < .05). Results. A total of 2,353 surveys were delivered. The adjusted response rate was 22.4% (n = 528/2353) with a total of 348 usable responses from full-time active Florida pharmacists. Respondents’ average age was 44 years with more than half (51%) female. On average, four patient care services were offered and 27% of pharmacists’ time was spent on patient care. A pharmacist’s motivation to work was significantly associated with more patient care services offered, more time spent on patient care, and a lower workload level. Conclusion. Florida pharmacists at workplaces which offered more opportunities for patient-centered services were more motivated to work. Therefore, it is important to incorporate patient care into pharmacists’ routine work responsibilities. Grants. Funded by the HPD Research Committee.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

Predictors of Florida Pharmacists’ Motivation to Work at Their Primary Place of Employment

Objective. The study purpose was to examine important predictors of active full-time Florida pharmacists’ motivation to work at their primary place of employment. Background. As the pharmacy profession moves towards more patient-centered care, it is important to determine how this current nationwide trend impacts Florida pharmacists’ motivation to work. Methods. Using a cross-sectional descriptive survey design, 2,400 pharmacists with active licenses in Florida were mailed a 4-page questionnaire about work characteristics such as practice setting, patient care services offered, actual time spent on patient care, workload level, and motivation to work at their primary place of employment. Additionally, pharmacists’ personal information such as age, gender, position and employment status were collected. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Linear regression analysis was conducted to determine significant predictors of pharmacists’ motivation to work (p < .05). Results. A total of 2,353 surveys were delivered. The adjusted response rate was 22.4% (n = 528/2353) with a total of 348 usable responses from full-time active Florida pharmacists. Respondents’ average age was 44 years with more than half (51%) female. On average, four patient care services were offered and 27% of pharmacists’ time was spent on patient care. A pharmacist’s motivation to work was significantly associated with more patient care services offered, more time spent on patient care, and a lower workload level. Conclusion. Florida pharmacists at workplaces which offered more opportunities for patient-centered services were more motivated to work. Therefore, it is important to incorporate patient care into pharmacists’ routine work responsibilities. Grants. Funded by the HPD Research Committee.