Presentation Title

Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane for Modulation of Periodontal Soft Tissue Healing: A Pilot Study

Format

Event

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this randomized pilot study was to evaluate the value of cryopreserved amniotic membrane (CAM) in helping the cicatrization and wound healing after placement of dental implants. The epithelialization rate, the pain, the risk of infection, and the presence of inflammation and scarring were studied. Background. Amniotic membrane constitutes an immunologically compatible surgical patch, currently used in ocular surface reconstruction. Several lymphokines contribute to the amniotic membrane’s biological actions: Transforming Growth Factor-β, Transforming Growth Factor-α, Keratinocyte Growth Factor, Neural Growth Factor, and Collagens I, II, III, IV. It has been shown to reduce acute inflammatory response and to be an excellent tissue for reconstructive surgery, because it has healing properties, is commercially available , ethically acceptable, easy to use and easily stored. Methods. Cryopreserved amniotic membrane was placed in the area of periodontal surgical wounds related to implant placement. Randomization was achieved concerning which side had the CAM and what side was operated upon first. The extent of healing was evaluated by a blind investigator, for lesion size, epithelialization, pain, infection, inflammation and scarring. Clinical evaluation occurred at baseline, 72 hours, 144 hours 2 weeks, 1 month 1.5 months, and 3 months. The results were compared with conventionally managed similar lesions, treated the same day in the same patient, as self control. Results. This prospective randomized pilot study did show statistically significant differences between the experimental and the control groups. Conclusion. The usefulness of cryopreserved amniotic membrane during the healing and cicatrization period in periodontal surgery was demonstrated. Grants. Funding for this project was provided through the Nova Southeastern University President’s Faculty Research and Development Grant #HPD-DEN04030801.

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Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane for Modulation of Periodontal Soft Tissue Healing: A Pilot Study

Objectives. The purpose of this randomized pilot study was to evaluate the value of cryopreserved amniotic membrane (CAM) in helping the cicatrization and wound healing after placement of dental implants. The epithelialization rate, the pain, the risk of infection, and the presence of inflammation and scarring were studied. Background. Amniotic membrane constitutes an immunologically compatible surgical patch, currently used in ocular surface reconstruction. Several lymphokines contribute to the amniotic membrane’s biological actions: Transforming Growth Factor-β, Transforming Growth Factor-α, Keratinocyte Growth Factor, Neural Growth Factor, and Collagens I, II, III, IV. It has been shown to reduce acute inflammatory response and to be an excellent tissue for reconstructive surgery, because it has healing properties, is commercially available , ethically acceptable, easy to use and easily stored. Methods. Cryopreserved amniotic membrane was placed in the area of periodontal surgical wounds related to implant placement. Randomization was achieved concerning which side had the CAM and what side was operated upon first. The extent of healing was evaluated by a blind investigator, for lesion size, epithelialization, pain, infection, inflammation and scarring. Clinical evaluation occurred at baseline, 72 hours, 144 hours 2 weeks, 1 month 1.5 months, and 3 months. The results were compared with conventionally managed similar lesions, treated the same day in the same patient, as self control. Results. This prospective randomized pilot study did show statistically significant differences between the experimental and the control groups. Conclusion. The usefulness of cryopreserved amniotic membrane during the healing and cicatrization period in periodontal surgery was demonstrated. Grants. Funding for this project was provided through the Nova Southeastern University President’s Faculty Research and Development Grant #HPD-DEN04030801.