Presentation Title

The Impact of Clinical Pharmacists in Psychiatric Settings

Format

Event

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. The purpose was to evaluate the impact of clinical pharmacists’ interventions in psychiatric settings. Background. The literature reports psychiatrists are suffering from burnout at a high rate and cite administrative pressures as a primary culprit. Clinical pharmacists have been collaborating with psychiatrists for decades; however, the impact of such collaboration is not fully elucidated. Methods. A literature search for studies analyzing the effects of pharmacists in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Studies published between 1972 and 2011 were included. Search terms included: “pharmacy” or “pharmacist” in combination with “psychiatry,” “psychiatric” or “mental illness.” Studies referenced in identified trials were also included. Case studies and series were excluded. Results. Thirty-five studies met inclusion criteria: 22 outpatient studies and 13 inpatient studies. Only 13 trials utilized control groups, and eight studies included historic controls. Forty percent of all studies evaluated pharmacists’ impact on patient response and one-third examined economic outcomes. Over 66% of the trials found pharmacists were responsible for clinical improvement in patient symptoms, but only one of these studies included a control group. Pharmacist interventions had positive economic outcomes in over 90% of the trials including those with a control group. Conclusion. Multiple studies demonstrate the positive impact of pharmacists in psychiatric settings, particularly with respect to economic outcomes. However, these studies vary widely in quality and measured outcomes, and additional controlled trials are recommended to support the role of pharmacists in psychiatric settings. Grants. N/A

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

The Impact of Clinical Pharmacists in Psychiatric Settings

Objective. The purpose was to evaluate the impact of clinical pharmacists’ interventions in psychiatric settings. Background. The literature reports psychiatrists are suffering from burnout at a high rate and cite administrative pressures as a primary culprit. Clinical pharmacists have been collaborating with psychiatrists for decades; however, the impact of such collaboration is not fully elucidated. Methods. A literature search for studies analyzing the effects of pharmacists in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Studies published between 1972 and 2011 were included. Search terms included: “pharmacy” or “pharmacist” in combination with “psychiatry,” “psychiatric” or “mental illness.” Studies referenced in identified trials were also included. Case studies and series were excluded. Results. Thirty-five studies met inclusion criteria: 22 outpatient studies and 13 inpatient studies. Only 13 trials utilized control groups, and eight studies included historic controls. Forty percent of all studies evaluated pharmacists’ impact on patient response and one-third examined economic outcomes. Over 66% of the trials found pharmacists were responsible for clinical improvement in patient symptoms, but only one of these studies included a control group. Pharmacist interventions had positive economic outcomes in over 90% of the trials including those with a control group. Conclusion. Multiple studies demonstrate the positive impact of pharmacists in psychiatric settings, particularly with respect to economic outcomes. However, these studies vary widely in quality and measured outcomes, and additional controlled trials are recommended to support the role of pharmacists in psychiatric settings. Grants. N/A