Event Title

Linking Academia and Home-Based Social Services to Assist Low-Income Seniors: A Senior Intervention and Education Program

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Background. Frail, low-income, community-dwelling seniors with multiple medical conditions face hardships related to aging in place, premature institutionalization, health management, stress and isolation. Objective. NSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Broward County partnered on a Senior Intervention and Education Program to provide psychosocial and health services to low income seniors. Methods. Program goals were to (1) teach management techniques and support options to seniors and caregivers to foster self-care and cope with physical limitations, (2) maintain seniors’ independence to remain at home with security, (3) reduce premature institutionalization, and (4) prevent elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. NSU medical students accompanied a nurse/social worker on monthly home visits assessing seniors’ living environments and resources, and evaluating their functional abilities. Results. This program provided services to 248 seniors (64% aged 75 and older, 62% female, 72% White, 28% Black and 11% Hispanic). Program services included the free distribution of donated specialized medical equipment, consumable medical supplies (together valued at over $33,000), food and food vouchers (valued at $1,270), case management (1,112 hours), caregiver training (113 hours), health education (183 episodes), counseling (277 hours), home injury control (192 episodes), assistance with service applications (45 episodes), referral (142 episodes) and inhome emergency respite (280 hours). Conclusion. This award-winning program provided low-income seniors with needed services, while the novel medical component gave future physicians first hand knowledge of vulnerable elders outside of the customary medical arena. Funding. This program was supported in 2008-2009 by the Jim Moran Foundation.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Linking Academia and Home-Based Social Services to Assist Low-Income Seniors: A Senior Intervention and Education Program

Background. Frail, low-income, community-dwelling seniors with multiple medical conditions face hardships related to aging in place, premature institutionalization, health management, stress and isolation. Objective. NSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Broward County partnered on a Senior Intervention and Education Program to provide psychosocial and health services to low income seniors. Methods. Program goals were to (1) teach management techniques and support options to seniors and caregivers to foster self-care and cope with physical limitations, (2) maintain seniors’ independence to remain at home with security, (3) reduce premature institutionalization, and (4) prevent elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. NSU medical students accompanied a nurse/social worker on monthly home visits assessing seniors’ living environments and resources, and evaluating their functional abilities. Results. This program provided services to 248 seniors (64% aged 75 and older, 62% female, 72% White, 28% Black and 11% Hispanic). Program services included the free distribution of donated specialized medical equipment, consumable medical supplies (together valued at over $33,000), food and food vouchers (valued at $1,270), case management (1,112 hours), caregiver training (113 hours), health education (183 episodes), counseling (277 hours), home injury control (192 episodes), assistance with service applications (45 episodes), referral (142 episodes) and inhome emergency respite (280 hours). Conclusion. This award-winning program provided low-income seniors with needed services, while the novel medical component gave future physicians first hand knowledge of vulnerable elders outside of the customary medical arena. Funding. This program was supported in 2008-2009 by the Jim Moran Foundation.