Presentation Title

Baseline Neuro-Cognitive Functioning in a University Athletic Department

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objectives. Athletes who sustain brain injury are more likely to suffer subsequent concussions, making assessment and diagnosis crucial (Guskiewicz et al., 2003; Lovell, Collins & Bradley, 2004). Background. Concussions are now known as a functional injury, with disrupted cerebral metabolism post-injury (Hovda et al., 1999). Notable advances in clinical management include using neurocognitive screening devices at baseline, immediately following injury, and when making return-to-play (RTP) decisions (Van Kampen, Lovell, Pardini, Collins, & Fu, 2006). RTP guidelines recommend athletes resume participation only after their asymptomatic status is paired with complete cognitive recovery, often defined as equaling or surpassing baseline performance on cognitive screening instruments (Moser, 2007). Despite increased focus on concussions, no studies have reported the medical or neuropsychological data gathered during the baseline testing process. Methods. Demographic and neuro-cognitive data was collected from 237 student athletes (98 men, 139 women) within an NCAA Division-II athletic program as part of a clinical sportconcussion initiative. Pre-participation screening included a neuro-cognitive screening test which measured attention, memory, reaction time, and visual-motor speed as well as 22 symptoms associated with concussion. Results. Approximately 12% of participants reported a history of concussion, which is 2.5 times larger than the percentage reported in the NCAA injury surveillance data over a 16-year period. For those with a concussion history (28), about 18% reported more than one concussive injury. Conclusions. Over 20% of participants endorsed headache, fatigue, hyposomnia, or feeling more emotional at baseline. 10-20% reported trouble falling asleep, drowsiness, irritability, sadness, nervousness, hypersomnia, or difficulty with either concentration or memory. Lastly, a larger than expected proportion of athletes scored in the Borderline and Impaired ranges on the neuro-cognitive screening instrument. Grants. None.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Baseline Neuro-Cognitive Functioning in a University Athletic Department

Objectives. Athletes who sustain brain injury are more likely to suffer subsequent concussions, making assessment and diagnosis crucial (Guskiewicz et al., 2003; Lovell, Collins & Bradley, 2004). Background. Concussions are now known as a functional injury, with disrupted cerebral metabolism post-injury (Hovda et al., 1999). Notable advances in clinical management include using neurocognitive screening devices at baseline, immediately following injury, and when making return-to-play (RTP) decisions (Van Kampen, Lovell, Pardini, Collins, & Fu, 2006). RTP guidelines recommend athletes resume participation only after their asymptomatic status is paired with complete cognitive recovery, often defined as equaling or surpassing baseline performance on cognitive screening instruments (Moser, 2007). Despite increased focus on concussions, no studies have reported the medical or neuropsychological data gathered during the baseline testing process. Methods. Demographic and neuro-cognitive data was collected from 237 student athletes (98 men, 139 women) within an NCAA Division-II athletic program as part of a clinical sportconcussion initiative. Pre-participation screening included a neuro-cognitive screening test which measured attention, memory, reaction time, and visual-motor speed as well as 22 symptoms associated with concussion. Results. Approximately 12% of participants reported a history of concussion, which is 2.5 times larger than the percentage reported in the NCAA injury surveillance data over a 16-year period. For those with a concussion history (28), about 18% reported more than one concussive injury. Conclusions. Over 20% of participants endorsed headache, fatigue, hyposomnia, or feeling more emotional at baseline. 10-20% reported trouble falling asleep, drowsiness, irritability, sadness, nervousness, hypersomnia, or difficulty with either concentration or memory. Lastly, a larger than expected proportion of athletes scored in the Borderline and Impaired ranges on the neuro-cognitive screening instrument. Grants. None.