Event Title

Sturge Weber Syndrome: Related Glaucoma

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Introduction. This case is important to eye care professionals because it is a rare condition that many optometrists have not treated. Case Presentation. A 67 year old African American male presents with a history of Sturge Weber Syndrome (SWS). The patient has port-wine stains on the left side of his face and secondary glaucoma. The patient’s complicated secondary glaucoma is being managed with maximum medical therapy. This case details the pathophysiology and management of glaucoma associated with SWS. Deviation from expected. This patient has potential bilateral glaucoma. In most cases of SWS related glaucoma is monocular on the side that has the port wine stain. However in this case bilateral peripheral iridotomies have been done as well as medical therapy in both eyes. Discussion. Sturge Weber Syndrome is one of the phakomatoses. Congenital hamaromatous malformations affect skin, eyes, and the central nervous system. Ocular complications include secondary glaucoma due to elevated episcleral venous pressure. Conclusion. SWS is a very dynamic and rare condition that has been studied in detail. However, because this condition is rare few clinicians have had clinical experience in treating these patients. With the new medical therapy developing in the last few years, we may now be able to control the intraocular pressures in these patients more effectively.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Sturge Weber Syndrome: Related Glaucoma

Introduction. This case is important to eye care professionals because it is a rare condition that many optometrists have not treated. Case Presentation. A 67 year old African American male presents with a history of Sturge Weber Syndrome (SWS). The patient has port-wine stains on the left side of his face and secondary glaucoma. The patient’s complicated secondary glaucoma is being managed with maximum medical therapy. This case details the pathophysiology and management of glaucoma associated with SWS. Deviation from expected. This patient has potential bilateral glaucoma. In most cases of SWS related glaucoma is monocular on the side that has the port wine stain. However in this case bilateral peripheral iridotomies have been done as well as medical therapy in both eyes. Discussion. Sturge Weber Syndrome is one of the phakomatoses. Congenital hamaromatous malformations affect skin, eyes, and the central nervous system. Ocular complications include secondary glaucoma due to elevated episcleral venous pressure. Conclusion. SWS is a very dynamic and rare condition that has been studied in detail. However, because this condition is rare few clinicians have had clinical experience in treating these patients. With the new medical therapy developing in the last few years, we may now be able to control the intraocular pressures in these patients more effectively.