Event Title

Resources Necessary for the Retention of Foreign Trained Nurses

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Background. The Florida Center for Nursing workforce information from January 2006 indicates that progress is not being made in the effort to address the nursing shortage in Florida. (FCN, 2006). Although nursing programs have increased enrollment, vacancy rates for the employment of RNs remains flat and may be increasing. Many healthcare facilities recruit foreign nurses to supplement the supply of available registered nurses. Historically, this has been done in the U.S. to help relieve cyclic shortages; however, prior to this shortage has not been seen as a long term approach to solve the nursing shortage. Currently the efforts to recruit nurses from other countries have intensified. In South Florida many nurses are recruited from the Philippine Islands. Little is known about this segment of the U.S. RN workforce. Statistics range from 3.7% to over 5% of the RN workforce classified as “foreign nurses”. Objective. This presentation will provide insight into the necessary resources need for retention of foreign trained nurses. Methods. This research study provided information generating an understanding of the experience of Filipino nurses working at a hospital in South Florida. Nine Filipino nurses were interviewed to historically reflect on their transition to the United States. All of these nurses have been employed for 24-29 years in the same health care facility. Findings. Findings included recurrent themes of cultural understanding and spirituality. Conclusions. Organizations that provided support for these themes had longevity and loyalty with these nurses. The designated support person to transition between the two cultures was paramount to the adjustment process.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Resources Necessary for the Retention of Foreign Trained Nurses

Background. The Florida Center for Nursing workforce information from January 2006 indicates that progress is not being made in the effort to address the nursing shortage in Florida. (FCN, 2006). Although nursing programs have increased enrollment, vacancy rates for the employment of RNs remains flat and may be increasing. Many healthcare facilities recruit foreign nurses to supplement the supply of available registered nurses. Historically, this has been done in the U.S. to help relieve cyclic shortages; however, prior to this shortage has not been seen as a long term approach to solve the nursing shortage. Currently the efforts to recruit nurses from other countries have intensified. In South Florida many nurses are recruited from the Philippine Islands. Little is known about this segment of the U.S. RN workforce. Statistics range from 3.7% to over 5% of the RN workforce classified as “foreign nurses”. Objective. This presentation will provide insight into the necessary resources need for retention of foreign trained nurses. Methods. This research study provided information generating an understanding of the experience of Filipino nurses working at a hospital in South Florida. Nine Filipino nurses were interviewed to historically reflect on their transition to the United States. All of these nurses have been employed for 24-29 years in the same health care facility. Findings. Findings included recurrent themes of cultural understanding and spirituality. Conclusions. Organizations that provided support for these themes had longevity and loyalty with these nurses. The designated support person to transition between the two cultures was paramount to the adjustment process.