Presentation Title

The Effects of Occupational Choice on the Self-Esteem of Juveniles in Detention

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. To determine the effect of occupational choice on the self-esteem of juveniles currently at a South Florida detention center. Occupational choice is defined as having the ability to make valid and realistic choices in what actions to make, activities to participate in, and which peer groups to associate with (Paulson, 1980). The occupational choice in this study will be participation in a talent show. Background. Literature suggests that when youth are shown positive options of extracurricular activities, and made aware of the skills they possess, they are more likely to have higher self-esteem. They are also likely to make positive peer groups, and as a result may avoid delinquent activities. According to Kaplan’s Self-Derogation Theory of Delinquency, youth with little opportunity and low self-esteem tend to participate in delinquency to increase their self-esteem. Methods. Every youth at the detention center will be given the opportunity to participate in the Talent show. There will be four groups: (A) those who choose to plan the talent show, (B) those who choose to perform in the talent show, (C) those involved in both, and (D) those who have received consent and assent to participate, but choose not to. Participants will be given the Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem before the talent show activity begins and again after activity has ended. A comparison of the pre and post data will determine if there were any effects on perceived self-esteem. Results. This is a study in progress and will be completed by March 2010.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

The Effects of Occupational Choice on the Self-Esteem of Juveniles in Detention

Objective. To determine the effect of occupational choice on the self-esteem of juveniles currently at a South Florida detention center. Occupational choice is defined as having the ability to make valid and realistic choices in what actions to make, activities to participate in, and which peer groups to associate with (Paulson, 1980). The occupational choice in this study will be participation in a talent show. Background. Literature suggests that when youth are shown positive options of extracurricular activities, and made aware of the skills they possess, they are more likely to have higher self-esteem. They are also likely to make positive peer groups, and as a result may avoid delinquent activities. According to Kaplan’s Self-Derogation Theory of Delinquency, youth with little opportunity and low self-esteem tend to participate in delinquency to increase their self-esteem. Methods. Every youth at the detention center will be given the opportunity to participate in the Talent show. There will be four groups: (A) those who choose to plan the talent show, (B) those who choose to perform in the talent show, (C) those involved in both, and (D) those who have received consent and assent to participate, but choose not to. Participants will be given the Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem before the talent show activity begins and again after activity has ended. A comparison of the pre and post data will determine if there were any effects on perceived self-esteem. Results. This is a study in progress and will be completed by March 2010.