Event Title

The Gender Difference in the Specialty Choice Among Osteopathic Medicine Physicians in the United States

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. This study examined the gender differences in specialty choice among current Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) physicians in the US. Background. During the past two decades, DO physicians increased significantly and currently account for 7.5% of total physician workforce in the US. A growing proportion of them were female physicians. Methods. Total DO Physician data from American Medical Association were used. Discrete choice model was used to examine the patterns of specialty choice by time and/or year of graduation, and place of practice. Results. In 2007, 44,544 male and 17,277 female DO physicians were in practice. 35% of females and only 19% of males were younger than 35. Female residents accounted for 21.6% of female DO who were in patient care, compared with only 10.7% for males. Residents in Primary care specialties were 8 percent points higher among females than males. Among male residents, internal medicine accounted for 19%, followed by family medicine (15%), anesthesia (8.5%), pediatrics (6.3%) and emergency medicine (6%). Among female residents, family medicine accounted for 19%, followed by internal medicine (18.5%), pediatrics (14%), obstetrics /gynecology (7.5%), and psychiatrics (5%). These patterns were largely unchanged among physicians aged 35-44. Conclusion. Female physicians were more likely engaged in primary care specialties. This will have significant impact on future physician workforce and pattern of practice in the US. Grants. None.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

The Gender Difference in the Specialty Choice Among Osteopathic Medicine Physicians in the United States

Objective. This study examined the gender differences in specialty choice among current Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) physicians in the US. Background. During the past two decades, DO physicians increased significantly and currently account for 7.5% of total physician workforce in the US. A growing proportion of them were female physicians. Methods. Total DO Physician data from American Medical Association were used. Discrete choice model was used to examine the patterns of specialty choice by time and/or year of graduation, and place of practice. Results. In 2007, 44,544 male and 17,277 female DO physicians were in practice. 35% of females and only 19% of males were younger than 35. Female residents accounted for 21.6% of female DO who were in patient care, compared with only 10.7% for males. Residents in Primary care specialties were 8 percent points higher among females than males. Among male residents, internal medicine accounted for 19%, followed by family medicine (15%), anesthesia (8.5%), pediatrics (6.3%) and emergency medicine (6%). Among female residents, family medicine accounted for 19%, followed by internal medicine (18.5%), pediatrics (14%), obstetrics /gynecology (7.5%), and psychiatrics (5%). These patterns were largely unchanged among physicians aged 35-44. Conclusion. Female physicians were more likely engaged in primary care specialties. This will have significant impact on future physician workforce and pattern of practice in the US. Grants. None.