Event Title

Use of Latent Class Analysis to Risk Stratify Clinically Depressed Patients: An Evaluation using Clinical and Biological Markers

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Introduction. In spite of major technological advancements in health care, psychiatric evaluation and treatment of clinical depression remains largely subjective. In a previous work, the authors showed stress to be highly correlated to depression, and were able to risk stratify individuals into one of three classes. The objective of this research is to provide biological correlates and strengthen the risk stratification found in the previous with the hope of establish objective guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of major depressive disorder. Methods. In the Summer and Fall of 2009, students from Nova Southeastern University who utilize the Ziff Student Medical Center were asked to participate in the research study. All participants were over 18 years of age. No media was used to advertise the study and no compensation was offered for participation. Study materials included standard set of 2 psychological assessment tools (the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)). The PSS assesses the participant’s level of perceived stress over the last month. The BDI assesses the participant’s level of depression through a twenty-one item questionnaire. After participants completed the survey, a physician documented their vitals, medications, and medical symptoms experienced in the past month. Results. Results are due by the end of 2009. Discussion. Analysis of results will be completed by January of 2010. The authors will then seek publication by March of 2010. Grants. This study was funded by an NSU HPD grant.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Use of Latent Class Analysis to Risk Stratify Clinically Depressed Patients: An Evaluation using Clinical and Biological Markers

Introduction. In spite of major technological advancements in health care, psychiatric evaluation and treatment of clinical depression remains largely subjective. In a previous work, the authors showed stress to be highly correlated to depression, and were able to risk stratify individuals into one of three classes. The objective of this research is to provide biological correlates and strengthen the risk stratification found in the previous with the hope of establish objective guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of major depressive disorder. Methods. In the Summer and Fall of 2009, students from Nova Southeastern University who utilize the Ziff Student Medical Center were asked to participate in the research study. All participants were over 18 years of age. No media was used to advertise the study and no compensation was offered for participation. Study materials included standard set of 2 psychological assessment tools (the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)). The PSS assesses the participant’s level of perceived stress over the last month. The BDI assesses the participant’s level of depression through a twenty-one item questionnaire. After participants completed the survey, a physician documented their vitals, medications, and medical symptoms experienced in the past month. Results. Results are due by the end of 2009. Discussion. Analysis of results will be completed by January of 2010. The authors will then seek publication by March of 2010. Grants. This study was funded by an NSU HPD grant.