Presentation Title

Are We Bringing HIV Testing to the Forefront of Routine Patient Care?

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. In 2006 the CDC revised testing guidelines in favor of having routine HIV screening in all medical settings. The guidelines include recommendations for frequency of HIV testing and “opt-out” consent. Primary care physicians, the largest majority in the osteopathic community, often have the initial encounter with an adult with HIV and sometimes the only resource for HIV management. This study was conducted to understand the behaviors and attitudes of osteopathic physicians toward HIV testing and sexual history-taking, including examining barriers to both. Method. A sample of 160 osteopathic physicians attending the 2009 Annual Florida Osteopathic Medical Association conference completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire using the paper-and-pencil survey format. Data were collected over a 4-day period in February, 2009. The study used a cross-sectional design to report socio-demographic data, attitudes and office practices pertaining to HIV and STI testing, and sexual history-taking. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Results. The majority (81%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that it is very important to obtain a separate consent form before an HIV test. Sixty-three percent recommended an annual HIV test for men who have sex with men (MSM); 85% recommended an HIV test for patients with a new STI; 59% recommended an annual STI screening for patients with a history of STIs. Nearly 80% had a positive attitude toward sexual history-taking during the initial visit. Thirty-one percent updated a patient’s sexual history only when pertinent information is provided by the patient. Conclusion. The findings suggest that many Florida osteopathic physicians have not yet adopted CDC’s recommendation regarding routine HIV testing in health care settings. Although most physicians recommend annual testing for patients in high risk groups (i.e., MSM), more efforts are needed to help physicians incorporate HIV testing as part of routine care for all patients. Grants. None.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Are We Bringing HIV Testing to the Forefront of Routine Patient Care?

Objective. In 2006 the CDC revised testing guidelines in favor of having routine HIV screening in all medical settings. The guidelines include recommendations for frequency of HIV testing and “opt-out” consent. Primary care physicians, the largest majority in the osteopathic community, often have the initial encounter with an adult with HIV and sometimes the only resource for HIV management. This study was conducted to understand the behaviors and attitudes of osteopathic physicians toward HIV testing and sexual history-taking, including examining barriers to both. Method. A sample of 160 osteopathic physicians attending the 2009 Annual Florida Osteopathic Medical Association conference completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire using the paper-and-pencil survey format. Data were collected over a 4-day period in February, 2009. The study used a cross-sectional design to report socio-demographic data, attitudes and office practices pertaining to HIV and STI testing, and sexual history-taking. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Results. The majority (81%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that it is very important to obtain a separate consent form before an HIV test. Sixty-three percent recommended an annual HIV test for men who have sex with men (MSM); 85% recommended an HIV test for patients with a new STI; 59% recommended an annual STI screening for patients with a history of STIs. Nearly 80% had a positive attitude toward sexual history-taking during the initial visit. Thirty-one percent updated a patient’s sexual history only when pertinent information is provided by the patient. Conclusion. The findings suggest that many Florida osteopathic physicians have not yet adopted CDC’s recommendation regarding routine HIV testing in health care settings. Although most physicians recommend annual testing for patients in high risk groups (i.e., MSM), more efforts are needed to help physicians incorporate HIV testing as part of routine care for all patients. Grants. None.