Event Title

Motion-Testing Palpation Using a Spring Model in 2nd Year Osteopathic Medical Students

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. The purpose of this study was to justify and validate osteopathic motion-testing diagnosis of simulated vertebral segments. Background. Previous studies have tested intra and inter-observer reliability for spinal evaluation using anteriorposterior translational springing. Inter-observer reliability in these studies has been poor compared with intra-observer reliability when testing on human subjects. Simulated models equipped with calibrated springs have been proven to be a reliable onedimensional stiffness stimulus for the evaluation of stiffness at a specific vertebral segment. Methods. Approximately 80 second year osteopathic medical students at Nova Southeastern University, College of Osteopathic medicine participated in the study. They performed testing on a wooden spring model, and the osteopathic medical students’ skill at performing diagnosis was assessed. Three wooden models with a spring mechanism simulating a vertebral segment were constructed. The spring mechanism provided rebound on either side when pressure was applied, mimicking the palpatory task of motion testing via palpation of the transverse processes of the thoracic spine. Model A was constructed with equal tension and coils on both sides. Models B and C were constructed with unequal tension, with one side having more spring than the other side. The students were instructed to press, using their thumbs, on the marked spot of the wooden model as if they were attempting to diagnose a somatic dysfunction of the thoracic spine. Once they have determined what side has increased tension, if any, they were be asked to do the same on the other two models and were asked to determine the side of increased tension, if any. Results. The results of the student’s correct diagnosis were analyzed, and it was found that 92% of all student participants were able to correctly diagnose at least two of the dysfunctional models, with 56% of the students overall diagnosing all three dysfunctional models correctly. Conclusion. It was found that second year medical students were able to correctly assess dysfunction using the spring model of palpation with a 92% accuracy in at least two of three simulated models. Further studies are needed with a larger population number to assess for accuracy based on handedness, and gender. Grants. None.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Motion-Testing Palpation Using a Spring Model in 2nd Year Osteopathic Medical Students

Objective. The purpose of this study was to justify and validate osteopathic motion-testing diagnosis of simulated vertebral segments. Background. Previous studies have tested intra and inter-observer reliability for spinal evaluation using anteriorposterior translational springing. Inter-observer reliability in these studies has been poor compared with intra-observer reliability when testing on human subjects. Simulated models equipped with calibrated springs have been proven to be a reliable onedimensional stiffness stimulus for the evaluation of stiffness at a specific vertebral segment. Methods. Approximately 80 second year osteopathic medical students at Nova Southeastern University, College of Osteopathic medicine participated in the study. They performed testing on a wooden spring model, and the osteopathic medical students’ skill at performing diagnosis was assessed. Three wooden models with a spring mechanism simulating a vertebral segment were constructed. The spring mechanism provided rebound on either side when pressure was applied, mimicking the palpatory task of motion testing via palpation of the transverse processes of the thoracic spine. Model A was constructed with equal tension and coils on both sides. Models B and C were constructed with unequal tension, with one side having more spring than the other side. The students were instructed to press, using their thumbs, on the marked spot of the wooden model as if they were attempting to diagnose a somatic dysfunction of the thoracic spine. Once they have determined what side has increased tension, if any, they were be asked to do the same on the other two models and were asked to determine the side of increased tension, if any. Results. The results of the student’s correct diagnosis were analyzed, and it was found that 92% of all student participants were able to correctly diagnose at least two of the dysfunctional models, with 56% of the students overall diagnosing all three dysfunctional models correctly. Conclusion. It was found that second year medical students were able to correctly assess dysfunction using the spring model of palpation with a 92% accuracy in at least two of three simulated models. Further studies are needed with a larger population number to assess for accuracy based on handedness, and gender. Grants. None.