Event Title

NSU Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial-Reading Study (CITT-RS): Design and Methods

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Background. Convergence insufficiency (CI), a common condition in school children, is often associated with symptoms such as frequent loss of place, loss of concentration, having to re-read, reading slowly, trouble remembering what was read, sleepiness, blurred vision, diplopia, headaches, and/or eyestrain. A recently completed randomized clinical trial demonstrated that treatment for convergence insufficiency resulted in significant decreases for the following behaviors: “difficulty completing assignments at school,” “difficulty completing homework,” and “fails to give attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or homework.” The question is whether these changes lead to an improvement in reading performance. This presentation describes the design and methodology of the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT-RS), is a multi-center study designed to provide pilot data about the association between CI and reading, attention, quality of life and the effectiveness of office-based vergence accommodative therapy in improving reading performance of children with symptomatic CI. Methods. There are two parts to CITTRS: CITT-RS Study A and CITT-RS Study B. The CITT-RS Study A, will be an assessment of reading, attention, and quality of life in children with symptomatic CI. CITT-RS Study B will be an intervention study to investigate the potential impact of successful treatment of CI on reading fluency. Data Analysis will be based upon data collected at all clinical sites within the CITT-RS study group from the 50 patients. A one-sample t-test will be used to compare the observed mean value of each outcome measure of children with symptomatic CI to published norms. Regression analysis and correlation coefficients will be used to evaluate the relationship between the clinical measures of convergence insufficiency and the reading measures. Results. Enrollment of subjects was completed in Dec 2009. Data collection of enrolled subjects in the intervention phase and at the final outcome session will be completed by June 2010. Conclusions. Features of this pilot study include formal definitions of conditions and outcomes, standardized diagnostic and treatment protocols, masked outcome examinations, and the CISS score outcome measure

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

NSU Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial-Reading Study (CITT-RS): Design and Methods

Background. Convergence insufficiency (CI), a common condition in school children, is often associated with symptoms such as frequent loss of place, loss of concentration, having to re-read, reading slowly, trouble remembering what was read, sleepiness, blurred vision, diplopia, headaches, and/or eyestrain. A recently completed randomized clinical trial demonstrated that treatment for convergence insufficiency resulted in significant decreases for the following behaviors: “difficulty completing assignments at school,” “difficulty completing homework,” and “fails to give attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or homework.” The question is whether these changes lead to an improvement in reading performance. This presentation describes the design and methodology of the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT-RS), is a multi-center study designed to provide pilot data about the association between CI and reading, attention, quality of life and the effectiveness of office-based vergence accommodative therapy in improving reading performance of children with symptomatic CI. Methods. There are two parts to CITTRS: CITT-RS Study A and CITT-RS Study B. The CITT-RS Study A, will be an assessment of reading, attention, and quality of life in children with symptomatic CI. CITT-RS Study B will be an intervention study to investigate the potential impact of successful treatment of CI on reading fluency. Data Analysis will be based upon data collected at all clinical sites within the CITT-RS study group from the 50 patients. A one-sample t-test will be used to compare the observed mean value of each outcome measure of children with symptomatic CI to published norms. Regression analysis and correlation coefficients will be used to evaluate the relationship between the clinical measures of convergence insufficiency and the reading measures. Results. Enrollment of subjects was completed in Dec 2009. Data collection of enrolled subjects in the intervention phase and at the final outcome session will be completed by June 2010. Conclusions. Features of this pilot study include formal definitions of conditions and outcomes, standardized diagnostic and treatment protocols, masked outcome examinations, and the CISS score outcome measure